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mark williams

Best Zero Range For Both .177 And .22

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Found a very informative topic about the best zero ranges PBR of .177 = 8.8 to 35 meters (9.7 to 38.3 yards) - PBR = point blank range.

.22 cal PBR = 6.3 to 28.5 meters (6.9 to 31.1 yards).

Basics are that if you were to zero to say 30 meters in .22 with a sub 12 ft/lb "ish" rifle you would run the risk of being out of your kill zone from 11.5 meters to 25.5 meters due to the pellets parabolic trajectory leaving the 2.5 cm ( 1 inch) kill zone.

So does this mean if you zero pellet on pellet to 31 yards in .22, your rifle will also be pellet on pellet at 6.9 yards ? Also does the information say that the pellets flight path will stay within a 1 inch flight path to these distances.(kill zone)

If you go to the hunting life search engine and type in best zero range you can read it for yourselves.( airgun discussion thread)

A big thank you for this information to Si Pitterway.

 

Are any lads shooting to this rule please and any info back.

I am shooting with the HW 100 KT .177 and the HW 100 ks .22 so will be interesting.

 

atb.

Edited by mark williams

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Hello mate, best thing to do is download chairgun. I put rifle and pellet data in for my .22 scorpion shooting aa field at 11.8ft/lbs. I used to zero at 30 but this meant my pellet spent most of the time out of the kill zone. I now zero at 27 yards so the pellet never goes above the kill zone, meaning no hold under, and from 8yards to 31.5 yards my pellet is in the kill zone. Its a good bit of software to play around with.

Edited by DenBell

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Found a very informative topic about the best zero ranges PBR of .177 = 8.8 to 35 meters (9.7 to 38.3 yards) - PBR = point blank range.

.22 cal PBR = 6.3 to 28.5 meters (6.9 to 31.1 yards).

Basics are that if you were to zero to say 30 meters in .22 with a sub 12 ft/lb "ish" rifle you would run the risk of being out of your kill zone from 11.5 meters to 25.5 meters due to the pellets parabolic trajectory leaving the 2.5 cm ( 1 inch) kill zone.

So does this mean if you zero pellet on pellet to 31 yards in .22, your rifle will also be pellet on pellet at 6.9 yards ? Also does the information say that the pellets flight path will stay within a 1 inch flight path to these distances.(kill zone)

If you go to the hunting life search engine and type in best zero range you can read it for yourselves.( airgun discussion thread)

 

 

A big thank you for this information to Si Pitterway.

 

Are any lads shooting to this rule please and any info back.

I am shooting with the HW 100 KT .177 and the HW 100 KT`s .22 so will be interesting.

 

atb.

Hi Mark, PBR means that over that range the pellet will fall within a 1 inch killzone but at the close range it will be up to half an inch lower, in the middle half an inch higher and at the further range half inch lower again.

For .177 that usually means the pellet will be on bullseye at roughly 16 yards and 35 yards. This can vary a bit depending on scope height and the power of the gun, pellets used etc.

Some shooters like to set their Zero to coincide with the highest point of the pellets trajectory which means not using holdunder at all as Denbell said. I don't worry about holdunder since most of my shooting is hunting and I rarely get shots at such close range, IE, 25 yards. The same principle applies to .22 but the figures are different because of the loopier trajectory.

Chairgun or Hawke BRC really is your friend here because you can put in all the data and come up with a set of aimpoints that will be very close to what your outfit can do. It always pays to prove those figures on paper in the field though.

Hope that helps!

Regards

Tim

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If you set your zero (.22) at the height of the trajectory then I rekon you will run out of midots somewhere around 70 yards lol fair enough shouldn't be hunting that far really but you know.

 

I use 28 for .22 and 34 for .177 ,Yards. only because this is convenient where I sit to zero there are trees at these ranges lol.

 

need to have a proper play with chairgun and input all the correct data and see what my trajectories are like with my different rifle and pellet combos.

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I`ve downloaded chair gun tonight but will need to study it.

Meantime I went to one of my permissions with both rifles, targets, range finder, note pad and pen.

First off my HW 100 KT .177 using air arms fields zero 37 yards.(pellet on pellet)- scope Mamba Lite MTC-SCB 4-12x44

 

37 yd perfect, 30yd p, 40 yd p,45 yd 3/4 md hold over,50 yd 1 md h over,55 yd 1 1/2 md h over,60 yd 21/2 md h over.

 

Second off my HW 100 ks .22 using air arms fields, zero 28 yards pellet on pellet.- scope Hawke Sport hd 4x 12x 50

 

28 yd perfect,35 yd 1 md h over,40 yd 2 md h over,45 yd 3 md h over,50 yd 4 md h over to a 5p coin.

I found that by using the mill dots the .22 HW was every bit as accurate as the .177 right out to 50 yds no problem hitting a 5p size target most shots,

I also found that .22 seemed less effected in the very slight breeze. In an un obstructed shoot(open ground) either calibre. In an obstructed shoot (through trees, etc, bramble etc) definately 177 calibre as the much flatter trajectory allows you to thread the pellet through the branches etc.

 

Just my humble opinion - atb

Edited by mark williams
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How do you find the general feel of the .177 with the mamba lite.?

Like eye-scope alignment and cheek position on the cheekpiece? Hows the balance? Does it feel 'right' ??

 

Also you should put a pic of your rifles up :D

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Hi Skot - general feel of the 177 HW KT with the Mamba Lite scope- I found this scope to say WHOE hold on - take your time and set me up well.So after fidgeting and setting eye alignments ,(very sensitive scope), she was set. Mate take your time with her because she is one lethally accurate scope. Was at my local range last week and was challenged to hit the letters on a cigarette box/packet called "amber leaf" at 40 yards,- she hit home with" precision".I felt like Clint Eastwood :boogy:when he said "you`ve upset my donkey".

Take your time with a Mamba Lite and boy will she pay you back.

n.b. Mamba Lites excell on a bi-pod

 

atb

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I`ve downloaded chair gun tonight but will need to study it.

Meantime I went to one of my permissions with both rifles, targets, range finder, note pad and pen.

First off my HW 100 KT .177 using air arms fields zero 37 yards.(pellet on pellet)- scope Mamba Lite MTC-SCB 4-12x44

 

37 yd perfect, 30yd p, 40 yd p,45 yd 3/4 md hold over,50 yd 1 md h over,55 yd 1 1/2 md h over,60 yd 21/2 md h over.

 

Second off my HW 100 ks .22 using air arms fields, zero 28 yards pellet on pellet.- scope Hawke Sport hd 4x 12x 50

 

28 yd perfect,35 yd 1 md h over,40 yd 2 md h over,45 yd 3 md h over,50 yd 4 md h over to a 5p coin.

I found that by using the mill dots the .22 HW was every bit as accurate as the .177 right out to 50 yds no problem hitting a 5p size target most shots,

I also found that .22 seemed less effected in the very slight breeze. In an un obstructed shoot(open ground) either calibre. In an obstructed shoot (through trees, etc, bramble etc) definately 177 calibre as the much flatter trajectory allows you to thread the pellet through the branches etc.

 

Just my humble opinion - atb

Edited by mark williams

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Wonderful thread, I guess we all worked out our zero ranges over the years by our own trial and error, but nice to know that computers probably back that up ;)

 

A slightly tangential thing, is how you are measuring the distance. I dont have a distance wheel for mapping exact yds. When plinking, I step / stride it out as I suspect most of you do. A while ago i realised some of my estimates were incorrect. Only slightly so, but enough. So here are some conversions that may well be useful.

 

So here is a brief guide to how 'steps' convert into 'yards'. Its true it will be 'slightly' different for all of us depending on height and step width, but these are the standard units for conversion.

 

10 steps = 8 yds

15 = 12.5

20 = 16

25 = 20

30 = 25

35 = 29

40 = 33

 

If you wanted to 'stride' it out with more protraction in your stride; then;

 

6 strides = 10 yds

9 = 15

12 = 20

15 = 25

18 = 30

21 = 35

Edited by Dr B

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Wonderful thread, I guess we all worked out our zero ranges over the years by our own trial and error, but nice to know that computers probably back that up ;)

 

A slightly tangential thing, is how you are measuring the distance. I dont have a distance wheel for mapping exact yds. When plinking, I step / stride it out as I suspect most of you do. A while ago i realised some of my estimates were incorrect. Only slightly so, but enough. So here are some conversions that may well be useful.

 

So here is a brief guide to how 'steps' convert into 'yards'. Its true it will be 'slightly' different for all of us depending on height and step width, but these are the standard units for conversion.

 

10 steps = 8 yds

15 = 12.5

20 = 16

25 = 20

30 = 25

35 = 29

40 = 33

 

If you wanted to 'stride' it out with more protraction in your stride; then;

 

6 strides = 10 yds

9 = 15

12 = 20

15 = 25

18 = 30

21 = 35

Due to a back injury I walk with a pronounced limp hence my my "stride length" differs from one leg to the other :( Any chance you have a conversion for this? At best it might help my ranging skills but failing that it may stop me walking in circles :D

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Hi james

 

Sorry to hear about your condition. Yes, I think there is an easy way to calculate a number that you can use. On average, there are 2.5ft to a single step and there are 3ft to a yard. Would you say your average step is say, half this due to your limp? If so, simply double the number of steps you need to make the same yards outlined above. Make sense? So, your step, in your case could be 1.25ft.

 

So, based on the numbers above, the standard units say, its 25 steps to mark out 20yds. For you, if your steps were half that of the standard units, then its 50 steps for 20yds. Does this sound reasonable, or are your steps, smaller / larger than half the standard units (i.e., one third or two thirds the average)? I can calculate more exactly if you would like.

 

I cant help with the walking in circles!!!!! :thumbs::laugh:

Edited by Dr B

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I`ve downloaded chair gun tonight but will need to study it.

Meantime I went to one of my permissions with both rifles, targets, range finder, note pad and pen.

First off my HW 100 KT .177 using air arms fields zero 37 yards.(pellet on pellet)- scope Mamba Lite MTC-SCB 4-12x44

 

37 yd perfect, 30yd p, 40 yd p,45 yd 3/4 md hold over,50 yd 1 md h over,55 yd 1 1/2 md h over,60 yd 21/2 md h over.

 

Second off my HW 100 ks .22 using air arms fields, zero 28 yards pellet on pellet.- scope Hawke Sport hd 4x 12x 50

 

28 yd perfect,35 yd 1 md h over,40 yd 2 md h over,45 yd 3 md h over,50 yd 4 md h over to a 5p coin.

I found that by using the mill dots the .22 HW was every bit as accurate as the .177 right out to 50 yds no problem hitting a 5p size target most shots,

I also found that .22 seemed less effected in the very slight breeze. In an un obstructed shoot(open ground) either calibre. In an obstructed shoot (through trees, etc, bramble etc) definately 177 calibre as the much flatter trajectory allows you to thread the pellet through the branches etc.

 

Just my humble opinion - atb[/quote

I take it the scope height pellet weight and your chosen magnification your going to use has are detrimental to what your perfect zero will be?

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