Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Long Neting And Dog.


  • Please log in to reply
59 replies to this topic

#31 ferretman89

ferretman89

    Mega Hunter

  • Donator
  • 428 posts
  • Location:Co.Durham

Posted 12 December 2013 - 04:08 pm

If they are bashed up inside its a bit of free ferret food. I personally find with my dog that rabbits in the net he just holds and doesnt damage them. How ever if caught on the lamp or ones that have slipped they sometimes are a bit bashed but thats when having ferrets come in handy as they are not fussed what they eat lol :)

 

Can understand why some dont like dogs in the net but so long as they release and dont bash the rabbits insides up then doesnt really matter :)



#32 rough dog

rough dog

    Plasterer To The Stars

  • Donator
  • 432 posts
  • Location:The Valleys

Posted 12 December 2013 - 05:32 pm

I hate to see a dog chomping on a rabbit whether it`s in a net or lamping or whatever I just look at it as wasted meat !


  • J Darcy and Mr Wilkes like this

#33 ands

ands

    Born Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 215 posts
  • Location:The mysterious RCT triangle

Posted 12 December 2013 - 05:33 pm

I got a collie here that I use to net at night, he don't hunt bunnys but quarters land towards the net an in process sends the bunnys for the safety of there Warren, and into my net I've put in front of it, some will say he is a long netting dog, others won't. I don't mind nor care as he does what I want

Agree HM a dog at night makes a huge difference, them rabbits hurtle towards the nets with a bit of dog scent drifting around the field.


  • Bossie likes this

#34 Mick C.

Mick C.

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 698 posts
  • Location:corking rat holes up snuff.

Posted 12 December 2013 - 06:23 pm

Brambles and nettle stalks can really put the brakes on an otherwise fast pursing net.

 

For me a dog that holds is an asset especially when working alone.

 

:thumbs:



#35 Tiercel

Tiercel

    Extreme Hunter

  • Moderator
  • 7,450 posts
  • Location:West Wales

Posted 12 December 2013 - 06:38 pm

 

I got a collie here that I use to net at night, he don't hunt bunnys but quarters land towards the net an in process sends the bunnys for the safety of there Warren, and into my net I've put in front of it, some will say he is a long netting dog, others won't. I don't mind nor care as he does what I want

Agree HM a dog at night makes a huge difference, them rabbits hurtle towards the nets with a bit of dog scent drifting around the field.

 

Why would you want the rabbit hurtling towards the nets at top speed? :hmm:

 

When the rabbits are hitting the nets at full pelt this is the result.

 

 

Bounce offs all over the place, where as if they had walked the rabbits calmly into the net they would have had no bounce offs.

 

TC



#36 smithie

smithie

    Extreme Hunter

  • Donator
  • 2,454 posts
  • Location:moomin valley

Posted 12 December 2013 - 07:10 pm

i dont think you can control the speed the bunnies run at, true you could probably make them go faster but the skitty ones that are always going to sprint and wont slow down no matter how slow and steady you are..

 

now the bounce off is imo a bit more controlable although in netting game nothing is a given..

in the video if i remember was hemp net well for a start i would get rid of that and have sheet neting or engels if it was possible. 4z, double knitt and a correct set net with ample bagging will limit this as the bunnies ball up and if its of a good size mesh the head of the rabbit is going through the mesh..

 

all you can do is move slow and set the correct net the best you can..



#37 J Darcy

J Darcy

    Gimplet

  • Donator
  • 13,027 posts
  • Location:Lincs......

Posted 12 December 2013 - 07:41 pm

i would have had the pegs sloping in the direction the rabbits were travelling to....I've never seen bounce-offs like it! .



#38 Tiercel

Tiercel

    Extreme Hunter

  • Moderator
  • 7,450 posts
  • Location:West Wales

Posted 12 December 2013 - 07:54 pm

i would have had the pegs sloping in the direction the rabbits were travelling to....I've never seen bounce-offs like it! .

Mr Darcy, it would be pointless sloping the pegs away from the oncoming rabbit as they are travelling too fast. The idea of sloping the pegs away from the oncoming rabbits is that the rabbit is standing on the net when it hits the wall of the net and gets it claws caught in the net on the floor, the speed those rabbit were hitting the net was just as fast as when daytime ferreting.

 

TC



#39 Hot Meat

Hot Meat

    Extreme Hunter

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,366 posts
  • Location:Wales

Posted 12 December 2013 - 07:59 pm

I don't use a dog to tet bunnys moving any faster I simply use a dog as I'd rather be out with a dog than without. The dog I use has no interest in bunnys what so ever wether in a net or sat in a field or laying belly up behind the nets. That's why I use him. I don't even own him he belongs to my In laws. If I used my dogs. Which I do daytime ferreting with nets then I wouldn't enjoy the night half as much lol I could go out alone without a dog. But where's the pleasure in that. Especially if you have an obedient non rabbiting dog with you that ain't a problem. As far bunnys bouncing off I have to admit that either my nets are real good or I'm real lucky as I never seem to witness it happening and on a lot of my drops I never leave net and only use 25 yders so I do get to see a but of the action. 


Edited by Hot Meat, 12 December 2013 - 08:01 pm.

  • ands and smithie like this

#40 Tiercel

Tiercel

    Extreme Hunter

  • Moderator
  • 7,450 posts
  • Location:West Wales

Posted 12 December 2013 - 08:01 pm

i dont think you can control the speed the bunnies run at, true you could probably make them go faster but the skitty ones that are always going to sprint and wont slow down no matter how slow and steady you are..

 

now the bounce off is imo a bit more controlable although in netting game nothing is a given..

in the video if i remember was hemp net well for a start i would get rid of that and have sheet neting or engels if it was possible. 4z, double knitt and a correct set net with ample bagging will limit this as the bunnies ball up and if its of a good size mesh the head of the rabbit is going through the mesh..

 

all you can do is move slow and set the correct net the best you can..

Smithie, please believe me when I say you can control the speed and direction rabbits will travel just by your own actions. Obviously not every rabbit but as a general rule you can. Your last stament is so close to the truth, but it takes time and patients and a lot of mistakes to learn this. Some people just do not have it in them, they want instant gratification and if you want to learn it does not work like that.

 

TC



#41 smithie

smithie

    Extreme Hunter

  • Donator
  • 2,454 posts
  • Location:moomin valley

Posted 12 December 2013 - 08:10 pm

 

i dont think you can control the speed the bunnies run at, true you could probably make them go faster but the skitty ones that are always going to sprint and wont slow down no matter how slow and steady you are..

 

now the bounce off is imo a bit more controlable although in netting game nothing is a given..

in the video if i remember was hemp net well for a start i would get rid of that and have sheet neting or engels if it was possible. 4z, double knitt and a correct set net with ample bagging will limit this as the bunnies ball up and if its of a good size mesh the head of the rabbit is going through the mesh..

 

all you can do is move slow and set the correct net the best you can..

you can control the speed and direction rabbits will travel just by your own actions. Obviously not every rabbit but as a general rule you can. 

TC

 

thats my point. you can get them all to go fast but some sprint and you can not slow them down.. i just don not write/ explain myself very well

 

i have seen a bunny (full moon out wi mr wilk) run down a banking for 50 yds and through a gate then sprint a thurther 100 yds to hit a net.. absolutly no way i could have slowed that down unless i had sat mr wilks near the gate and got him to stick out his foot as it ran past :laugh:

 

but a good net set right will im sure cause less bouncers that a 6z set half arsed with too little bagging.. we do are best to do our best



#42 smithie

smithie

    Extreme Hunter

  • Donator
  • 2,454 posts
  • Location:moomin valley

Posted 12 December 2013 - 08:14 pm

 As far bunnys bouncing off I have to admit that either my nets are real good or I'm real lucky as I never seem to witness it happening and on a lot of my drops I never leave net and only use 25 yders so I do get to see a but of the action. 

clearly your doing something right :thumbs:



#43 Hot Meat

Hot Meat

    Extreme Hunter

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,366 posts
  • Location:Wales

Posted 12 December 2013 - 08:19 pm

I believe it's in the net and setting mate tbh I got a double stranded net here off net rigger and it's as tho it's made from cotton or something. I don't make nets so ain't net material savvy lol bill will know tho. Add to that lots of bagging not set too high and sloping a tad, but most importantly in the right place lol I only set nets infront or around the warrens I know the bunnys will hear for rather than in there path. Like iv said that's what works for me  :thumbs:



#44 smithie

smithie

    Extreme Hunter

  • Donator
  • 2,454 posts
  • Location:moomin valley

Posted 12 December 2013 - 08:22 pm

cant argue with that... 



#45 Tiercel

Tiercel

    Extreme Hunter

  • Moderator
  • 7,450 posts
  • Location:West Wales

Posted 12 December 2013 - 08:42 pm

 

 

i dont think you can control the speed the bunnies run at, true you could probably make them go faster but the skitty ones that are always going to sprint and wont slow down no matter how slow and steady you are..

 

now the bounce off is imo a bit more controlable although in netting game nothing is a given..

in the video if i remember was hemp net well for a start i would get rid of that and have sheet neting or engels if it was possible. 4z, double knitt and a correct set net with ample bagging will limit this as the bunnies ball up and if its of a good size mesh the head of the rabbit is going through the mesh..

 

all you can do is move slow and set the correct net the best you can..

you can control the speed and direction rabbits will travel just by your own actions. Obviously not every rabbit but as a general rule you can. 

TC

 

thats my point. you can get them all to go fast but some sprint and you can not slow them down.. i just don not write/ explain myself very well

 

i have seen a bunny (full moon out wi mr wilk) run down a banking for 50 yds and through a gate then sprint a thurther 100 yds to hit a net.. absolutly no way i could have slowed that down unless i had sat mr wilks near the gate and got him to stick out his foot as it ran past :laugh:

 

but a good net set right will im sure cause less bouncers that a 6z set half arsed with too little bagging.. we do are best to do our best

 

Smithie, the object is to get the rabbits moving back to thier place of safety, then intercept them with the long nets. Most rabbits that bolt have been spooked by some one getting close to them before the rabbit winded or heard them. Give the rabbit enough notice that you are coming and they usually hop away infront of you, same as they do during the day, walk into a field of feeding rabbits during the day, what happens? The rabbits who were feeding close to you bolt for saftey those that are further out in the field will usually make their way to the hedge and then stop to re-asses the situation. That is the type of scenario that you want to repeat when night time netting.

 

 As an example say a field is 200yards wide from where you have set the net to the opposite hedge. You place the net then walk round to start your bant.you are then walking with the wind at your back or coming from a side blowing your scent infront or to the side of you. The rabbits in that field could be anywhere from the opposite hedge to the net to a couple of yards off the net. Any rabbits that are feeding close to the hedge will have a shock when you turn up to start the bant, and as a consiquence will bolt for home. yet if you had bypassed the hedge and I know it is not always possible, gone into the field above the rabbits feeding close to the hedge would have more time to hear / smell you and not feel so pressured.

 

The problem is we are dealing with unpredictable wild animals all we can do is make the odds more in out favour, it will never be 100% in our favour but with a little thought you can reduce the odds somewhat.

 

TC




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users