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Attack Fell Terrier

Electrolyte drinks

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Thanks for the reply and the recipe Sowhat :good:

 

Would depend on what and when but in general for a healthy dog no.

Dogs don’t sweat to any degree so don’t lose salts as humans and horses, for which these products were first developed, racing dog owner jumped on the bandwagon, myself included 30 odd years ago, as we didn’t understand the concept. The manufactures saw a new market and so produced a product.

Most contain glucose and this may help recovery.

 

ISandy the bit about sweating that you mentioned is why I asked. If I'm not mistaken I thought Electrolytes replace lost salts and minerals that we lose through sweating! I know dogs don't sweat so whats the point in giving a dog an electrolyte drink?

 

Would a sugary drink or a drink with added glucose be a better option?

 

Sandy you've made plenty of very interesting posts on this section of the forum, some I agree with and some I don't agree with, but never the less I do find what you say interesting. If you don't mind me asking do you work dogs or do you just look into the science and theory?

 

I'm just interested to know what you've found to be true through your own experience?

 

Thanks for posting pal.

Ideation it doesn’t matter so much if you agree or disagree more that you consider what is posted, we are all wrong sometimes, even me lol. In answer I’ve owned working/racing dogs for most of my 50 years. So I base my post on a mix of experience and science, stuff mores forward and in working dogs we tend to lag behind at times. As to losing electrolytes via drool, some will be lost but likely a negligible amount unless it is going on for a long time in which the first question would be why is it drooling? I’ve covered the idea of electrolytes before at depth as well as corresponded with vets on the subject, basically they are replaced via a normal diet and it’s a finely balanced closely controlled system that in a healthy dog is best left alone, adding in random electrolytes is as likely to unbalance as it would re balance. The companies themselves don’t recommend them in any but very mild cases, certainly not for dogs that have been run hard and so have even the slightest risk of rhabdomyolysis.

 

Ideation? You got the wrong person mate.

 

Thanks for the info though, I think I'll have to conduct my own tests to see whats best for my dog. As I'm sure that (like people) Some dogs will work better on certain supplements than others will.

 

Thanks again Sandy.

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The way this forum is at the moment it will have folk kiling each other..can anyone tell me where Ideation come into it..as on my moniter he has not said a word on the subject.. :blink:

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The way this forum is at the moment it will have folk kiling each other..can anyone tell me where Ideation come into it..as on my moniter he has not said a word on the subject.. :blink:

especially if youve lost rabbits :whistling:

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just a question, whats your thoughts on creatine ?

 

Not a great fan, again gotten from a decent diet in plentiful amounts

 

The way this forum is at the moment it will have folk kiling each other..can anyone tell me where Ideation come into it..as on my moniter he has not said a word on the subject.. :blink:

I don't know, spect i had a senior moment :huh:

 

At the moment I'm looking at creatinine levels, a waste product of muscle metabolism, as I've recently noticed raised levels in younger people who also suffer with excessive cramping. One in particular suffered regularly with cramping from toe to upper back. They were athletic and it's known that increased muscle mass will increase levels to a degree but theirs were much higher than expected to the extent they had been under investigation by kidney specialist.

Secondly night cramps are not uncommon in the elderly and this group will commonly also have a reduced kidney function and so reduced creatinine clearance.

 

In dogs those with the highest muscle mass percentage would also then likely have the highest creatinine levels such as greyhounds and other sight hounds along with bull breeds, and these are the very dogs most commonly being reported with cramping, ie racing greys and bull cross lurchers.

So one theory is that levels get raised by exercise from a high base level to the extent that it begins to interfere with metabolic processes.

Another theory would be that its not the waste product but the starting point which is causing the problem, the starting point is creatine

 

Link re creatine for those with a background in such things.

http://www.medicinenet.com/creatinine_blood_test/article.htm

Edited by sandymere

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:laugh:@ Paul Edited by Millet

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

 

Have a read of the link below mate!

 

http://dioralyte.co.uk/content/about-dioralyte?gclid=CN-CspzMzbACFUUhtAoddhZbYw

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

 

Have a read of the link below mate!

 

http://dioralyte.co....CFUUhtAoddhZbYw

cheers mate,

Spotted on page it does contain glucose, I reckon i will put some of that in the car kit then, unless no one chirps up and says different

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

 

Have a read of the link below mate!

 

http://dioralyte.co....CFUUhtAoddhZbYw

cheers mate,

Spotted on page it does contain glucose, I reckon i will put some of that in the car kit then, unless no one chirps up and says different

 

I'll definitely be doing the same mate. I can't see how a childs ammount is going to hurt.

 

Dioralyte it is then!

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interesting read on electrolyte,feeding and excercise from a greyhound vet and surgen :thumbs:

http://www.monashvet.../greyhounds.htm

 

Some good stuff on there.

I have some adult dyralyte lying around will use that if needed as maybe half dose, am not too concerned though about amount as I think its the sort of thing that is just pissed out if there is an excess

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That sound's about right from what i have seen in certain dog's Paul..the top and bottom of it is some need it and some don't..

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