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Like anything else, it's silly to kill them all.

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Rooks in large numbers can cause more damage then woodies to a crop and crops arent the only thing on their hit list. Song bird populations suffer ground nesting birds will suffer they take eggs, chicks and take the eyes out of newborn lambs. rooks are not good in large numbers.

atb

Get your damn facts right!

Rooks are not predatory, they don't attack lambs and don't affect songbird populations.

They are an agricultural pest and do eat animal feeds and are known to take seeds.

They also eat a huge number of leather jackets (cranefly larvae) which are a pest to farmers.

I thought differently, but im not going to argue with you because I know you know your stuff and are probably going to be right

its surprising the amount of shooters/hunters that dont know the difference between rooks and crows,

And if that comment was directed at me (sorry if it wasnt) I do know full well the difference between a crow and a rook so dont try and have a dig it was just a mistake on their feeding habits

atb Ratty

Edited by Ratsmasher

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Rooks in large numbers can cause more damage then woodies to a crop and crops arent the only thing on their hit list. Song bird populations suffer ground nesting birds will suffer they take eggs, chicks and take the eyes out of newborn lambs. rooks are not good in large numbers.

atb

Get your damn facts right!

Rooks are not predatory, they don't attack lambs and don't affect songbird populations.

They are an agricultural pest and do eat animal feeds and are known to take seeds.

They also eat a huge number of leather jackets (cranefly larvae) which are a pest to farmers.

I thought differently, but im not going to argue with you because I know you know your stuff and are probably going to be right

its surprising the amount of shooters/hunters that dont know the difference between rooks and crows,

And if that comment was directed at me (sorry if it wasnt) I do know full well the difference between a crow and a rook so dont try and have a dig it was just a mistake on their feeding habits

atb Ratty

Thanks Ratty- I like you lol!

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rook's are corvids and by there nature are oppurtunistic feeders. maybe not the the extent of crows and maggies. but rooks will and do take eggs and nestlings of other birds. they are pests and i snuff em out on site. there numbers can get out of hand and need checkin, plus they are dumber than crows ''and easier to shoot. lol.. but yeah i agree wit some of wats been said''no species should be eradicated.

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so would you shoot them or not duncan as we can c your mad 4 the shooting.or have you never been ask by a farmer to sort a pest out i thought thats why they give permission

Damn right I shoot them - as I said they are an agricultural pest and I book brancher day off each year to do just that.

When I cook them, branchers taste better than fillet steak :)

I wasn't objecting to Rooks being shot, just the reasons given. A pest? yes. A criminal species akin to crows and magpies? No.

 

Duncan when is brancher day then. :hmm: joe.

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I will put my 2 pence in the farmers that dont like rooks that I have come across are the ones growing sugar beat as the rook eats the leather jacks and in doing so pull out the crop

they do eat chicks and eggs but are no way as bad as a crow.

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so would you shoot them or not duncan as we can c your mad 4 the shooting.or have you never been ask by a farmer to sort a pest out i thought thats why they give permission

Damn right I shoot them - as I said they are an agricultural pest and I book brancher day off each year to do just that.

When I cook them, branchers taste better than fillet steak :)

I wasn't objecting to Rooks being shot, just the reasons given. A pest? yes. A criminal species akin to crows and magpies? No.

 

Duncan when is brancher day then. :hmm: joe.

12th of May my friend :) Yesterday.

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Never seen a rook working the hedgerow for nests :rolleyes: . That'll be crows. FFS.

wasting your time mate :laugh:

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Never seen a rook working the hedgerow for nests :rolleyes: . That'll be crows. FFS.

wasting your time mate :laugh:

I know, I know....'you can't educate pork'!

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I have a old bird book of britian and it quite clearly says they will eat young birds and eggs along with other stuff, it maybe they eat them as opportunists rather then going out there way to actively hunt them. off topic but just because you have never seen it does not mean it does not happen people say kestrels dont or cant eat rabbits as they are to small but i have seen this with my own eyes a wild one that is, and trained ones will take them to but books say other wise reading this back to myself maybe they dont eat chicks or eggs just my book say they do. lol

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In all the year's i have spent in the countryside i am yet to see a rook raiding a bird's nest for egg's and young..now on the other hand i have seen carrion crow's and magpie's do it on countless occasion's..

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so for all the corvid experts how do you tell a young crow from a young rook????? and duncan if you shoot branchers on the 12th of May you would be too late most years especialy this year

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Moo i can tell buy looking at the beak it's more pointed also rook's have more feathering on the leg's and rook's tend to walk more rather than hopping like carrion's do most of the time..

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