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#61 thursodog

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 10:28 am

Watch the .22lr for ricochets.
I'd use traps close to houses.

Edited by thursodog, 22 January 2012 - 10:30 am.


#62 Deker

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 10:44 am

Watch the .22lr for ricochets.
I'd use traps close to houses.


I'll take that as the jovial comment you intended.

Traps can be time consuming, and therefore expensive, clients commonly want quick results, to try and trap a family of 5 foxes in one garden would be all but impossible, some may be immature but they learn fast, I took the whole family of 5 foxes out in one evening shooting in the garden, actually in about 90 minutes!

You don't get ricochets from a .22lr when you hit a fox in the right place, and as I already said, these jobs were surveyed and baited to appropriate shooting positions, so ricochets were about as likely as my 25,000,000 WIN in the Nigerian lottery!

Whichever way you want to look at it, you do not necessarily need a CF when you go out specifically after the fox!

The fact is I do quite a lot of these close foxes, I have just emailed off the quote for a job I surveyed yesterday, farmyards, stables, barns, gardens, whatever, there are plenty of tools that are more appropriate than a CF in many situations.

:yes: :yes: :thumbs:

ATB!

Edited by Deker, 22 January 2012 - 10:48 am.


#63 thursodog

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 11:02 am

We all miss sometimes pal, not a joke just a well known fact with the .22lr.
I've had ricochets with them myself when i've been out for rabbits.

Atb Chris.

#64 Deker

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 11:30 am


Watch the .22lr for ricochets.
I'd use traps close to houses.


I'll take that as the jovial comment you intended.

Traps can be time consuming, and therefore expensive, clients commonly want quick results, to try and trap a family of 5 foxes in one garden would be all but impossible, some may be immature but they learn fast, I took the whole family of 5 foxes out in one evening shooting in the garden, actually in about 90 minutes!

You don't get ricochets from a .22lr when you hit a fox in the right place, and as I already said, these jobs were surveyed and baited to appropriate shooting positions, so ricochets were about as likely as my 25,000,000 WIN in the Nigerian lottery!

Whichever way you want to look at it, you do not necessarily need a CF when you go out specifically after the fox!

The fact is I do quite a lot of these close foxes, I have just emailed off the quote for a job I surveyed yesterday, farmyards, stables, barns, gardens, whatever, there are plenty of tools that are more appropriate than a CF in many situations.

http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...

ATB!

We all miss sometimes pal, not a joke just a well known fact with the .22lr.
I've had ricochets with them myself when i've been out for rabbits.

Atb Chris.


I am well aware of the potential behavioural habits of the .22lr, that's why these sites are surveyed for suitability and set up accordingly. Nobody is perfect, but I get paid to do this and a professional job is expected and delivered.

We are not talking about wondering around a field and missing rabbits with a .22lr, we are talking about setting up a fox shooting gallery in someones garden.

I have highlighted the part of my post you don't appear to have seen, in the unlikely event I missed then the shot was safe, this is the beauty of being able to survey jobs, and set things up the way you want and train the fox to go where you want him.

Regardless of all this, your contention that a CF is required if you go out specifically for fox is misguided.

:thumbs:
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#65 thursodog

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 04:21 pm

Fair enough bud, i must admit i've never done the close quarter garden/urban foxing so i'll happily stand corrected on that one.
I fox out on farms with the usual longer distances and squeaker.
Atb Chris.

#66 Deker

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 06:09 pm

Fair enough bud, i must admit i've never done the close quarter garden/urban foxing so i'll happily stand corrected on that one.
I fox out on farms with the usual longer distances and squeaker.
Atb Chris.


Totally agree, if I was looking at 200 yards Open field and foxes I'd leave the .22lr at home! :thumbs:

#67 riflehunter583

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 06:45 pm



Watch the .22lr for ricochets.
I'd use traps close to houses.


I'll take that as the jovial comment you intended.

Traps can be time consuming, and therefore expensive, clients commonly want quick results, to try and trap a family of 5 foxes in one garden would be all but impossible, some may be immature but they learn fast, I took the whole family of 5 foxes out in one evening shooting in the garden, actually in about 90 minutes!

You don't get ricochets from a .22lr when you hit a fox in the right place, and as I already said, these jobs were surveyed and baited to appropriate shooting positions, so ricochets were about as likely as my 25,000,000 WIN in the Nigerian lottery!

Whichever way you want to look at it, you do not necessarily need a CF when you go out specifically after the fox!

The fact is I do quite a lot of these close foxes, I have just emailed off the quote for a job I surveyed yesterday, farmyards, stables, barns, gardens, whatever, there are plenty of tools that are more appropriate than a CF in many situations.

http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...

ATB!

We all miss sometimes pal, not a joke just a well known fact with the .22lr.
I've had ricochets with them myself when i've been out for rabbits.

Atb Chris.


I am well aware of the potential behavioural habits of the .22lr, that's why these sites are surveyed for suitability and set up accordingly. Nobody is perfect, but I get paid to do this and a professional job is expected and delivered.

We are not talking about wondering around a field and missing rabbits with a .22lr, we are talking about setting up a fox shooting gallery in someones garden.

I have highlighted the part of my post you don't appear to have seen, in the unlikely event I missed then the shot was safe, this is the beauty of being able to survey jobs, and set things up the way you want and train the fox to go where you want him.

Regardless of all this, your contention that a CF is required if you go out specifically for fox is misguided.

http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...

do you find the fox control business busy at the minute? or is it just a part of a wider pest control job involving many other pests, like mole, wasps nests, bed bugs etc?

#68 matt_hooks

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 06:51 pm

I've taken foxes with .22LR, .22WMR, .243 win and 12 bore. All can do the job if you remember the limitations and put the lead in the right place.

A .22LR carries plenty of energy to cleanly kill a fox, so the HMR (with about three times the ME) will do the job fine. Of course the HMR loses KE more quickly than the LR, but it only takes a few ft.lb to kill with a good brain shot.

The WMR is a better round for foxes than the HMR though! (runs for cover)

Deker, where abouts in Berks are you? If you ever need an extra gun...... ;)

#69 Deker

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 07:06 pm

do you find the fox control business busy at the minute? or is it just a part of a wider pest control job involving many other pests, like mole, wasps nests, bed bugs etc?


My add in Yell.com, is under Fox Control, I also advertise in various other media, including wasps, (they are a bit quiet at the moment :laugh: ), I do my best to avoid the fleas, bedbugs etc. I also do contract Fox/Deer etc. work for some National and local Pest Control companies who are not really set up for this sort of thing but want to be able to advertise a wide service. I personally concentrate on squirrel, rabbit, fox and deer, but inevitably other work comes in, and I pass out contract work as well, for example, my main Mole Man is top dollar and kept Stonehenge upright for many years.

Fox work is steady, all year contracts and one off jobs, but has seasonal, and media induced fluctuations, for example, a while back when those two children were "attacked" :hmm: :hmm: :hmm: by a fox in their bedroom, the phone went mad!

#70 riflehunter583

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 07:26 pm


do you find the fox control business busy at the minute? or is it just a part of a wider pest control job involving many other pests, like mole, wasps nests, bed bugs etc?


My add in Yell.com, is under Fox Control, I also advertise in various other media, including wasps, (they are a bit quiet at the moment http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... ), I do my best to avoid the fleas, bedbugs etc. I also do contract Fox/Deer etc. work for some National and local Pest Control companies who are not really set up for this sort of thing but want to be able to advertise a wide service. I personally concentrate on squirrel, rabbit, fox and deer, but inevitably other work comes in, and I pass out contract work as well, for example, my main Mole Man is top dollar and kept Stonehenge upright for many years.

Fox work is steady, all year contracts and one off jobs, but has seasonal, and media induced fluctuations, for example, a while back when those two children were "attacked" http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... by a fox in their bedroom, the phone went mad!

i used to work for a nacker man locally when i were younger and he paid me next to nothing, but i loved the job straingly!

since i ran my own business delaing in geneartors which served me well but never enjoyed it even though there was money in it.

i have come to a time when i actually want to get into pest control such as rabbit and fox control in my area - midlands; as i have decided that money is not as important as acutaully enjoying getting up in the morning to do a job - so i have been interested in fox control.

do you need specialist qualifications to starting doing it?

#71 Deker

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 08:02 pm



do you find the fox control business busy at the minute? or is it just a part of a wider pest control job involving many other pests, like mole, wasps nests, bed bugs etc?


My add in Yell.com, is under Fox Control, I also advertise in various other media, including wasps, (they are a bit quiet at the moment http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... ), I do my best to avoid the fleas, bedbugs etc. I also do contract Fox/Deer etc. work for some National and local Pest Control companies who are not really set up for this sort of thing but want to be able to advertise a wide service. I personally concentrate on squirrel, rabbit, fox and deer, but inevitably other work comes in, and I pass out contract work as well, for example, my main Mole Man is top dollar and kept Stonehenge upright for many years.

Fox work is steady, all year contracts and one off jobs, but has seasonal, and media induced fluctuations, for example, a while back when those two children were "attacked" http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... by a fox in their bedroom, the phone went mad!

i used to work for a nacker man locally when i were younger and he paid me next to nothing, but i loved the job straingly!

since i ran my own business delaing in geneartors which served me well but never enjoyed it even though there was money in it.

i have come to a time when i actually want to get into pest control such as rabbit and fox control in my area - midlands; as i have decided that money is not as important as acutaully enjoying getting up in the morning to do a job - so i have been interested in fox control.

do you need specialist qualifications to starting doing it?


We digress somewhat from the Topic!

I couldn't live off Fox work alone, perhaps some can, but there are many areas of Pest Control/Environmental Services/Gamkeeping/Sporting Services/Etc/Etc.

In principle you don't need any qualifications for "Fox" work, (many companies/local authorities expect it though), and I am BPCA/RSPH qualified, and a few other bits of paper, which just helps with a logo, The BPCA doesn't exactly major on Fox control, (I actually gave one of the lecturers my business card during the course, I told him more about foxes than he knew), what you need are tools, experience and clients, it's a bit of a chicken and egg thing, the better you get at it the more work seems to turn up, but you have to try and start somewhere! :hmm: :thumbs:

You need to diversify generally, I'm not really interested in anything if I can't shoot it (at least as an option), I contract work out on a commission basis for moles, etc, but I love wasps, in the season you can make decent money for minimal outlay, but its a short season!

Oh Yes, and there are plenty of times I don't want to get up and go to work, and there are plenty of times when I'm on some farmers site in the middle of the night freezing cold in mid winter up to my ankles in mud and frost with freezing dew on my eyes looking for a fox, when you ask yourself how on earth did I get in to this?

And remember, day or night weekend or Bank Holiday, the pests of this world don't give a fig about OUR day off, neither do most of your clients! :no:

:thumbs: :thumbs:

Edited by Deker, 24 January 2012 - 10:09 am.


#72 foxing machine

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 08:19 pm

wats rong can your dog not catch them lol :boogy: :toast:

#73 riflehunter583

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 08:26 pm




do you find the fox control business busy at the minute? or is it just a part of a wider pest control job involving many other pests, like mole, wasps nests, bed bugs etc?


My add in Yell.com, is under Fox Control, I also advertise in various other media, including wasps, (they are a bit quiet at the moment http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... ), I do my best to avoid the fleas, bedbugs etc. I also do contract Fox/Deer etc. work for some National and local Pest Control companies who are not really set up for this sort of thing but want to be able to advertise a wide service. I personally concentrate on squirrel, rabbit, fox and deer, but inevitably other work comes in, and I pass out contract work as well, for example, my main Mole Man is top dollar and kept Stonehenge upright for many years.

Fox work is steady, all year contracts and one off jobs, but has seasonal, and media induced fluctuations, for example, a while back when those two children were "attacked" http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... by a fox in their bedroom, the phone went mad!

i used to work for a nacker man locally when i were younger and he paid me next to nothing, but i loved the job straingly!

since i ran my own business delaing in geneartors which served me well but never enjoyed it even though there was money in it.

i have come to a time when i actually want to get into pest control such as rabbit and fox control in my area - midlands; as i have decided that money is not as important as acutaully enjoying getting up in the morning to do a job - so i have been interested in fox control.

do you need specialist qualifications to starting doing it?


We digress somewhat from the Topic!

I couldn't live off Fox work alone, perhaps some can, but there are many areas of Pest Control/Environmental Services/Gamkeeping/Sporting Services/Etc/Etc.

In principle you don't need any qualifications for "Fox" work, (many companies/local authorities expect it though), and I am BPCA/RSPH qualified, and a few other bits of paper, which just helps with a logo, The BPCA doesn't exactly major on Fox control, (I actually gave one of the lecturers my business card during the course, I told him more about foxes than he knew), what you need are tools, experience and clients, it's a bit of a chicken and egg thing, the better you get at it the more work seems to turn up, but you have to try and start somewhere! http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...

You need to diversify generally, I'm not really interested in anything if I can't shoot it (at least as an option), I contract work out on a commission basis for moles, etc, but I love wasps, in the season you can make decent money for minimal outlay, but its a short season!

Oh Yes, and there are plenty of times I don't want to get up and go to work, and there are plenty of times when I'm on some farmers site in the middle of the night freezing cold in mid winter up to my angles in mud and frost with freezing dew on my eyes looking for a fox, when you ask yourself how on earth did I get in to this?

And remember, day or night weekend or Bank Holiday, the pests of this world don't give a fig about OUR day off, neither do most of your clients! http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...

http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...

its that old chestnut of turning a bit of a hobby into a job. and does it still remain enjoyable when one has to do it. instead of just choosing to do it for a bit of sport when the mood takes.
sounds like your 2 and 4 legged customers can be as much a pain at times as the customer that i deal with!

#74 Deker

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 08:37 pm

its that old chestnut of turning a bit of a hobby into a job. and does it still remain enjoyable when one has to do it. instead of just choosing to do it for a bit of sport when the mood takes.
sounds like your 2 and 4 legged customers can be as much a pain at times as the customer that i deal with!


Yep, more often than not, the tall 2 legged pests are the hardest to deal with! :yes:

#75 riflehunter583

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 08:58 pm


its that old chestnut of turning a bit of a hobby into a job. and does it still remain enjoyable when one has to do it. instead of just choosing to do it for a bit of sport when the mood takes.
sounds like your 2 and 4 legged customers can be as much a pain at times as the customer that i deal with!


Yep, more often than not, the tall 2 legged pests are the hardest to deal with! http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...

take care mate.

interesting chat.


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