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Roe Stalking

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#31 dicehorn

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 08:05 pm

A couple of years ago I had to put my old spaniel down, he had started to go blind and his back legs were clearly giving up on him. I decided that I would put him down on the basis he had lived by the gun and I convinced myself he would die by the gun. On that morning I dug a hole in the garden, he followed me out into the garden and I remember sitting on the wet grass and looking into those tired old eyes that were misting over with grey and whislt I cuddled him to me I gained strength from believing that keeping him alive was being selfish. Placed him gently in the pre dug hole and was given the strength to put the 22LR on the top of his old head so that the bullet would go down through his brain into his neck with the minimum amount of blood - in fact there was no blood. He went down in slow motion dead from the moment the bullet touched his brain - it was only after I shot my old friend did my hands shake.

I would never recommend using the vet or doing it yourself - there is no right answer. Sometimes is not about having the balls to do it - it is about the dog's quality of life that can give you the courage to make the decision.

I would just add a post script to the above. If you have other dogs that shared your deceased life, it is a good idea to let them see/sniff the dead dog, that way they will know from scent that it has died and is not just missing. To the original poster - whatever you finally decide will be the right thing but please please not a shotgun - you dont want your last physical memory of a good friend with most of its head missing.

Peter
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#32 Simoman

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 12:50 pm

A couple of years ago I had to put my old spaniel down, he had started to go blind and his back legs were clearly giving up on him. I decided that I would put him down on the basis he had lived by the gun and I convinced myself he would die by the gun. On that morning I dug a hole in the garden, he followed me out into the garden and I remember sitting on the wet grass and looking into those tired old eyes that were misting over with grey and whislt I cuddled him to me I gained strength from believing that keeping him alive was being selfish. Placed him gently in the pre dug hole and was given the strength to put the 22LR on the top of his old head so that the bullet would go down through his brain into his neck with the minimum amount of blood - in fact there was no blood. He went down in slow motion dead from the moment the bullet touched his brain - it was only after I shot my old friend did my hands shake.

I would never recommend using the vet or doing it yourself - there is no right answer. Sometimes is not about having the balls to do it - it is about the dog's quality of life that can give you the courage to make the decision.

I would just add a post script to the above. If you have other dogs that shared your deceased life, it is a good idea to let them see/sniff the dead dog, that way they will know from scent that it has died and is not just missing. To the original poster - whatever you finally decide will be the right thing but please please not a shotgun - you dont want your last physical memory of a good friend with most of its head missing.

Peter


Really good post mate and i agree with all of it apart from the post script, i just think this is anthropomorphic.......Bit agree 100% there is no right or wrong answer, jst whats right for your dog...........

#33 dicehorn

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 02:00 pm

Anthropomorphic? well I disagree with your assumption - animal behaviourist tend to agree that even animals need a closure. African elephants will all come over to a dead member of their family - call it final respects, but after examining the corpse they move on in both senses.

#34 Simoman

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 03:11 pm

Anthropomorphic? well I disagree with your assumption - animal behaviourist tend to agree that even animals need a closure. African elephants will all come over to a dead member of their family - call it final respects, but after examining the corpse they move on in both senses.



Why do assume its an assumption? :thumbs: Ive worked with behaviourists, even trained a few, i agree in some species relavence is given to dead animals, but with the vast majority its more often viewed upon as with indifference or as a potential meal.
Ive also read of the badger funerals and elephant graveyards.............Although i think we are going off at a tangent.............

#35 mackay

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 03:22 pm

Anthropomorphic? well I disagree with your assumption - animal behaviourist tend to agree that even animals need a closure. African elephants will all come over to a dead member of their family - call it final respects, but after examining the corpse they move on in both senses.



Agree with Simoman, for the last 25 yrs or so I've had an average kennel of eight dogs, over the years some have been rehomed at retirement age, some have been PTS and a couple have died in the field, never once have I seen any dog pine or be affected in any way. Truth be told I actually don't think they're missed by any other dog. As for animal behaviourists most have degrees not animals.

#36 Simoman

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 12:51 am


Anthropomorphic? well I disagree with your assumption - animal behaviourist tend to agree that even animals need a closure. African elephants will all come over to a dead member of their family - call it final respects, but after examining the corpse they move on in both senses.



Agree with Simoman, for the last 25 yrs or so I've had an average kennel of eight dogs, over the years some have been rehomed at retirement age, some have been PTS and a couple have died in the field, never once have I seen any dog pine or be affected in any way. Truth be told I actually don't think they're missed by any other dog. As for animal behaviourists most have degrees not animals.

So very true, around 2001 a behaviourist asked to attend an obedience class i was running, he explained after the class he had acheived his degree and was looing at setting up dog training classes and a behavioural clinic(cheeky b*****d me thinks), i asked him what experience he had and he replied he walked his mums dog once a week :yes: :icon_eek: Another came on a residential course we put on for manwork, a behaviourist from the magazine "dogs today" paid to come along but never as much as got her dog out of the car the entire week unless it was for a piss, i think we had her sussed in five minutes and she knew it.......And another who came to the course clueless and with no experience and is now a trainer on the tv series "dog borstal" :whistling: :whistling: :whistling:

#37 The Duncan

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 11:45 pm

I'm not sure I could put one of my own dogs down; I would rather have a trusted friend do it. But .22lr? Physiologicallly, would it 'do' a Ridgeback or Staffordshire Bull Terrier?
I'm not entirely sure.
hate to be graphic, but this question may come to me.

Edit: agreed on the point about going to the vets slab - had a totally beloved GSD put down a few years ago down to kidney failure (he was only 7) and the look in his eyes as the needle sought his vein was one of betrayal. This vision will haunt me to the grave.
I would rather he had gone 'on the hill' without knowing it was coming.
The 2 Ridgebacks we replaced him with never did the job.

#38 matt_hooks

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 09:22 am

But .22lr? Physiologicallly, would it 'do' a Ridgeback or Staffordshire Bull Terrier?


Absolutely, yes. An LR in the right place at close range has more than enough oomph to do the job. Whether the person holding the rifle is in any state to put that bullet in exactly the right spot is more important. I wouldn't fancy doing it myself, don't think I could be steady enough to pull the trigger.

#39 Cleanspade

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 04:08 pm


Anthropomorphic? well I disagree with your assumption - animal behaviourist tend to agree that even animals need a closure. African elephants will all come over to a dead member of their family - call it final respects, but after examining the corpse they move on in both senses.



Why do assume its an assumption? http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... Ive worked with behaviourists, even trained a few, i agree in some species relavence is given to dead animals, but with the vast majority its more often viewed upon as with indifference or as a potential meal.
Ive also read of the badger funerals and elephant graveyards.............Although i think we are going off at a tangent.............


i agree with the above..

#40 CWY308

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 08:17 pm

22LR is used to kill horses in the knackers yard and young male dairy cows, not how big it is it is where you point it
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#41 Sherrif

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Posted 24 November 2011 - 08:44 pm

Posted 20 September 2011 - 07:34 AM
Its time my old dog went that long one way walk and he is starting to suffer. The only thing is he hates the vet and i really don't want to take him there and put him on a table to die in the cold clinical room while others out side get there soft pot lickers there first jags seems the wrong way to do things to me. So is it legal for me to take him a walk to his favourite hill and just put him to sleep there my self.

How sad! I bet his eyes flew out when you popped him in the back the heed (slang)

PS. But Hey, I see you are back on SD Rudy, you need to crawl under a bigger rock than that to hide LMFAO

You,ll be changing your logon name now then.

Edited by Sherrif, 24 November 2011 - 08:59 pm.


#42 Caprelous

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Posted 24 November 2011 - 08:47 pm

How sad! I bet his eyes flew out when you popped him in the back the heed (slang)

PS. But Hey, I see you are back on SD Rudy, you need to crawl under a bigger rock than that to hide LMFAO



Very Sad not something I could do i think i would take it to the vets personally and end its suffering that way.

But it dosent surprise me the method you wish to choose Davey :hmm:

Edited by Caprelous, 25 November 2011 - 10:41 am.

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#43 gerfalcon

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Posted 24 November 2011 - 09:08 pm

Hey steady guys. In all seriousness have a bit of respect. If not for the man, at least for the dog.

Even I draw the line somewhere. :rtfm:

#44 foxdropper

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 09:29 am

A bit harsh i know but to my mind if a man cant do this one last thing for a trusted companion then its a poor show .Just dig the hole first .
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#45 gerfalcon

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 01:00 pm

I agree, dig your hole first. Crumble up a chocolate digestive on the side of the hole you want to be and walk the dog up to the treat, let it drop its head to have sniff and do the honours with a .22 sub and then say your goodbyes. All done peacefully and with dignity. Still one of the hardest things in the world to do with a dog that has given its whole life to your enjoyment. But you owe it to the dog at the end of its days.
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