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hawke SR12 scopes


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#61 secretagentmole

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 09:48 am

You need your gun chronographed with the pellets you will be using. Then you need to download Hawke Chairgun. Feed the data in and play with the magnification settings in the program!

#62 kpr1969

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:48 am

Chairgun is my friend...

#63 secretagentmole

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 11:21 am

Well select the SR12 reticle and get playing with the magnification, you will see the ranges in the display, try and get it to 5 metre or 5 yard steps!

#64 kpr1969

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:17 pm

thanks Mole,
I've just read back through the whole thread and seen the references to chairgun.
chrono is next on the shopping list...
Did you have your scope mounted as far forward on the rails as possible, even at this position I'm finding I have to keep my eye quite a distance from the scope to get a good image, not my preferred position.

also, any tips on something other than tin foil to raise the rear mount?

#65 zini

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 01:25 pm

Hi KPR,

Most scopes have around a 2.5 to 3.5 inch set eye relief so having you eye set well back from the scope is normal buddy.

Set your scope up by closing your eyes, raise your rifle into the aim and then open your shooting eye.

What you should see is a perfect round and full scope picture automatically. If not then move the scope either forward or backwards a bit and carry out the process again until you get what i have explained above naturally.

Regarding Chairgun Pro to get the accurate data that you are trying to ascertain you really do need to have the following info accurately measured:

Scope centre and barrel centre difference.

Power of your rifle either as in fps or msp or as a power reading as in ft / lbs or joules. When chronographing your rifle do it 10 times straight after each other and note each reading for all 10 shots. Then take a average as your power / speed reading.

Know your exact ballistic coefficient (BC) this you can get from Chairgun if the pellet your using is within the data base or you can more accurately work it out yourself like i do if you know how.

Lastly weigh a selection of 20 random pellets from your tin and then take a average. It will 90% of the time not be what it says on the tin. Add all this data to get the best and accurate results.

Chairgun is just a program so you put sh-t in and you will get sh-t out simple as.

I've just used this method myself 3 days ago with my SR12 scope on a Edgar Brothers XVI and I'm getting some very good results from a rifle only doing 10.7 ft / lbs now.

I did all this from the comfort of my sitting room before testing the data on metal targets out to 60 meters and the data was spot on to the aim point.

I've also doing this for Simon, Pianoman from this section and his data was also bang on enabling him to hit a 1p piece after my calibration straight away at 60 lased metres.

Si.

#66 kpr1969

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:24 pm

Hi KPR,

Most scopes have around a 2.5 to 3.5 inch set eye relief so having you eye set well back from the scope is normal buddy.

Set your scope up by closing your eyes, raise your rifle into the aim and then open your shooting eye.

What you should see is a perfect round and full scope picture automatically. If not then move the scope either forward or backwards a bit and carry out the process again until you get what i have explained above naturally.

Regarding Chairgun Pro to get the accurate data that you are trying to ascertain you really do need to have the following info accurately measured:

Scope centre and barrel centre difference.

Power of your rifle either as in fps or msp or as a power reading as in ft / lbs or joules. When chronographing your rifle do it 10 times straight after each other and note each reading for all 10 shots. Then take a average as your power / speed reading.

Know your exact ballistic coefficient (BC) this you can get from Chairgun if the pellet your using is within the data base or you can more accurately work it out yourself like i do if you know how.

Lastly weigh a selection of 20 random pellets from your tin and then take a average. It will 90% of the time not be what it says on the tin. Add all this data to get the best and accurate results.

Chairgun is just a program so you put sh-t in and you will get sh-t out simple as.

I've just used this method myself 3 days ago with my SR12 scope on a Edgar Brothers XVI and I'm getting some very good results from a rifle only doing 10.7 ft / lbs now.

I did all this from the comfort of my sitting room before testing the data on metal targets out to 60 meters and the data was spot on to the aim point.

I've also doing this for Simon, Pianoman from this section and his data was also bang on enabling him to hit a 1p piece after my calibration straight away at 60 lased metres.

Si.

Thanks Si...

I know you dont have your eye to the scope but I'm talking waaay back here to get the full clear picture without any clouding. might try and shift it a little farther forward on the rail and in the mounts.
I think it's gonna be a matter of getting used to...

Scope centre and barrel centre difference. can you explain this?

pellet scales ordered, combro's watched on ebay....anybody got one they want to sell???
think I'm gonna stick with the AA fields.

any ideas on a better solution than a bit of folded foil under the rear mount so the max 'up' setting on the scope zero is highter than where the pellet hits?

also...what should the adjustment on the front lens be set to for 'normal' sub 12 distances...

Thanks again Si, sorry for the 101 questions

#67 secretagentmole

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 07:30 am

Combros on ebay forget, they can go for double their cost, they only cost £41 new!

Where from?

http://www.chronoscopes.com/

Here from! Price includes VAT and postage, so buy one!

#68 zini

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 03:32 pm

Hi KPR,

This is from Chairgun and may help you:

Scope Height : the vertical distance between the optical centre of the scope and the centre of the bore at the muzzle - Inch or Centimetre.

Yes what is a lot better than tin foil is old camera negatives cut to fit your mounts. That's what I use if I get the same problem with a scope.

For normal sub 12 foot pound ranges on your AO its always best to self calibrate by turning the scope up to its full mag and then adjusting your AO at your preferred shooting range min and max until you get a crystal clear picture. Then stick some scope marking stickers onto you AO so you can go there instinctively next time without turning up you mag to full and setting the AO.

Si.

#69 kpr1969

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 07:31 pm

Combros on ebay forget, they can go for double their cost, they only cost £41 new!

Where from?

http://www.chronoscopes.com/

Here from! Price includes VAT and postage, so buy one!


ordered, nice one...


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