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WILF

Dog Training

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Ive got one Lurcher, his training started on day one of him coming home, he was trained not to pull on wool and was cattle broke from a real early age, i trained him some very basic commands very well. IMO there is so much we can do with pups before they hit the field. Hand signals are a good trick to have up your sleeve also, in fact i think it was J.Darcy who inspired me to train my Lurcher to high standards. A pup is most responsive to learning between 5-9 weeks of age, Starter pistols are good from this age to make a dog stable around noise also dvd's of fireworks and gun shots are available and very effective (nothing worse than seeing a dog turn to Jelly after a couple of gun shots). Even walking over crunchy plastic and puddles or stones steps etc will build confidence in a pup, its all about getting them into as many different enviroments as possable from an early age, try training your dog in the middle of a car boot with distractions arround, after all some of the pups commands could save his life one day but only if taught well.

 

 

Then theres physical training, somthing i keep light for the first year or two (allowing growth plates to settle) and joints to strenthen etc..

 

A well trained dog is far less likely to find himself in trouble out in the open.

 

YIS D

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Ive got one Lurcher, his training started on day one of him coming home, he was trained not to pull on wool and was cattle broke from a real early age, i trained him some very basic commands very well. IMO there is so much we can do with pups before they hit the field. Hand signals are a good trick to have up your sleeve also, in fact i think it was J.Darcy who inspired me to train my Lurcher to high standards. A pup is most responsive to learning between 5-9 weeks of age, Starter pistols are good from this age to make a dog stable around noise also dvd's of fireworks and gun shots are available and very effective (nothing worse than seeing a dog turn to Jelly after a couple of gun shots). Even walking over crunchy plastic and puddles or stones steps etc will build confidence in a pup, its all about getting them into as many different enviroments as possable from an early age, try training your dog in the middle of a car boot with distractions arround, after all some of the pups commands could save his life one day but only if taught well.

 

 

Then theres physical training, somthing i keep light for the first year or two (allowing growth plates to settle) and joints to strenthen etc..

 

A well trained dog is far less likely to find himself in trouble out in the open.

 

YIS D

excellent post :victory:

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Why do we train Lurchers and various other types early in their life and yet not train gundogs or manwork dogs until later in their life?.........

 

because the lurcher world has not caught up with the proper training methods of training through drive, they're starting lurchers before drive even kicks in , and in most cases lurchers owners are only point and slip men , not all but a lot are it dont matter about standards of training if thats the case, gun dogs and protection dogs see the owner as their channel to work , the handler controls the drive, most lurcher owners let the quarry control the dog , you think most lurcher owners could control their dog at the sight of a rabbit like a lab owner controls his when a bird goes down , not a chance, different methods different results,,

replys like this make me piss my myself :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: what a load of bollox :doh: so your saying every single lab wont chase a shot bird then???? if thats all you no about lurchers then id go out and learn alot more before you comment on them :bye: :bye:

 

if thats as much as you can add to the debate son, well so be it, ,im not saying every single anything , gundog owner generally try to reach a good standard with their dogs, which shows in the field and else where, and before you think im a gundog owner your wrong, kept lurchers all my life, but can admire a well trained dog in any code,,now go and change that pissy nappy before you develop a rash,,

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As I hoped, there are some very valid and interesting replys to this......keep going as I personally think its all making for good reading :thumbs:

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how much training does a lurcher really need,im not big on to much of it for my dogs if im honest i mainly lamp so recall and retrieve have to be bang on other than that im not to fussed i aint after a dog to sit on its arse and give me its paw,ok if you use your lurcher for various other hunting methods then you can train accordingly,sit stay,broken to stock and ferrets whatever plenty things you can train for but for me most of it is not required the little they do need to know can be taught from a very early age fieldcraft on the other hand is about getting them out there amongst it they are learning as they go im not training them they pick up more from my other dog than i could ever teach them, works for me.

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As I hoped, there are some very valid and interesting replys to this......keep going as I personally think its all making for good reading :thumbs:

 

 

i think there is also another element here wilf , which may have been overlooked and in due fairness to lurcher men, is a lurcher owner can admire the dog for sheer grace of movement, the ability to run, and just standing and watching in times gone past, a fit coursing dog in action , one on one with his quarry , now a dog dont need to be trained to do that as such,

 

whereas a good gun dog needs to be molded into a form of work which is acceptable to his owner, and still the wonder in the gun dog is watching him use his natural ability to work in his own area which is sightly more man made and as such needs a higher degree of training,

 

what im saying is both can be admired in their chosen sport, one admired for running and one admired for working , if ya get my drift,

 

if it caused either code any offence , it wasn't intended,,

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IMO there's nothing more infuriating than when you're mooching along, your dog spots a rabbit in the next field, or a good distance away, takes off after it while you're trying to attract its attention to the rabbit you have spotted squatting tight only a few feet away from you!

 

That is when good training comes in handy. If the dog is always allowed to hunt up by itself, with no direction from you, then it won't see you as anything very important in the hunt, and will consequently ignore you when you try to direct it.

 

There's a fine line between getting a lurcher pup out in the field and learning how to hunt, gaining good field craft skills, and simply taking a dog out for a walk and letting it do its own thing. IMO the balance comes from doing obedience training in the field from an early age, and getting the dog focused on you as well as looking for game. Which is one (and the only) reason why I like myxie rabbits for pups.

 

Myxie rabbits sit about in the daylight, and they're ideal for directing a pup on to them when you spot them: much better than just letting a pup tear about after impossible rabbits in the distance. This way the pup learns that you are instrumental in its success, and will see you as an important part of the hunting team rather than just someone who shouts and bawls when it gallops three fields away after stuff it has no chance of catching. Talking daytime mooching rabbiting dogs here.

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IMO there's nothing more infuriating than when you're mooching along, your dog spots a rabbit in the next field, or a good distance away, takes off after it while you're trying to attract its attention to the rabbit you have spotted squatting tight only a few feet away from you!

 

That is when good training comes in handy. If the dog is always allowed to hunt up by itself, with no direction from you, then it won't see you as anything very important in the hunt, and will consequently ignore you when you try to direct it.

 

There's a fine line between getting a lurcher pup out in the field and learning how to hunt, gaining good field craft skills, and simply taking a dog out for a walk and letting it do its own thing. IMO the balance comes from doing obedience training in the field from an early age, and getting the dog focused on you as well as looking for game. Which is one (and the only) reason why I like myxie rabbits for pups.

 

Myxie rabbits sit about in the daylight, and they're ideal for directing a pup on to them when you spot them: much better than just letting a pup tear about after impossible rabbits in the distance. This way the pup learns that you are instrumental in its success, and will see you as an important part of the hunting team rather than just someone who shouts and bawls when it gallops three fields away after stuff it has no chance of catching. Talking daytime mooching rabbiting dogs here.

 

totaly agree with what your saying so how would that compare to the requirements of a lamping dog in your opinion :thumbs:

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lurchers lose there touch the older they get ie speed so start them young where as gundogs etc are just plodders :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2:

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lurchers lose there touch the older they get ie speed so start them young where as gundogs etc are just plodders :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2:

 

never under estimate an older lurchers working ability yes the speed may be going but the brain will compensate

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lurchers lose there touch the older they get ie speed so start them young where as gundogs etc are just plodders :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2:

 

never under estimate an older lurchers working ability yes the speed may be going but the brain will compensate

a 7/8 years old lurcher aint going to be as on the ball as 3/4 year old lurcher top of his game...its a fact of life the older you get...the less capable you become and they age fast enough as it is :thumbs:

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tedd your a fountain of knowledge and your saving everyone petrol money going to shows to stand in beer tents to learn all the essentials is there an end to your talent? :laugh:

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lurchers lose there touch the older they get ie speed so start them young where as gundogs etc are just plodders :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2:

 

never under estimate an older lurchers working ability yes the speed may be going but the brain will compensate

a 7/8 years old lurcher aint going to be as on the ball as 3/4 year old lurcher top of his game...its a fact of life the older you get...the less capable you become and they age fast enough as it is :thumbs:

 

not disputing what your saying but still :thumbs:

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Ive got one Lurcher, his training started on day one of him coming home, he was trained not to pull on wool and was cattle broke from a real early age, i trained him some very basic commands very well. IMO there is so much we can do with pups before they hit the field. Hand signals are a good trick to have up your sleeve also, in fact i think it was J.Darcy who inspired me to train my Lurcher to high standards. A pup is most responsive to learning between 5-9 weeks of age, Starter pistols are good from this age to make a dog stable around noise also dvd's of fireworks and gun shots are available and very effective (nothing worse than seeing a dog turn to Jelly after a couple of gun shots). Even walking over crunchy plastic and puddles or stones steps etc will build confidence in a pup, its all about getting them into as many different enviroments as possable from an early age, try training your dog in the middle of a car boot with distractions arround, after all some of the pups commands could save his life one day but only if taught well.

 

 

Then theres physical training, somthing i keep light for the first year or two (allowing growth plates to settle) and joints to strenthen etc..

 

A well trained dog is far less likely to find himself in trouble out in the open.

 

YIS D

 

f**k me you had to read jd,s book to tell you that you have to train a lurcher to a high standard :laugh:

 

taking them out would tell you that if you have one thats wild and untrained you would catch next to f**k all compared to one that is there you go mate just saved you £30 on another book ffs

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Think folk are confusing training a pup and working a pup. Teach the basics young and as the pup develops change the training to suit. I don't understand the logic of letting a pup run free for the first 6months of it's life...but then again I am a simpleton :whistling:

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