Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

hungarian vizsla's


  • Please log in to reply
58 replies to this topic

#1 lampinglurcher

lampinglurcher

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • Location:Cornwall again

Posted 19 October 2006 - 03:48 pm

seen a couple of these around recently on the shooting scene, how do you guys rate them. of the vizsla's i've seen, apart from being beautiful dogs, they seem to have good noses and work hard. weimaraners seem to me like they'er abit more stubborn and want to do there own thing. any feedback would be appreciated.

thanks, matt

#2 kiwi

kiwi

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 796 posts
  • Location:new zealand

Posted 19 October 2006 - 08:07 pm

had a vizsla after i lost my first gwp, beautiful temp and nice hunting style bit short of guts though but for birds and fur great, had wei's as a kid and they where great dogs but the hunting blood is a bit short on the ground in this country and ya would have to go through a few dogs to find a working one. the show people have stuffed the breed up.

#3 Garypco

Garypco

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,266 posts
  • Location:west wales

Posted 19 October 2006 - 09:11 pm

seen a couple of these around recently on the shooting scene, how do you guys rate them. of the vizsla's i've seen, apart from being beautiful dogs, they seem to have good noses and work hard. weimaraners seem to me like they'er abit more stubborn and want to do there own thing. any feedback would be appreciated.

thanks, matt

i keep both vizsla's and weimeraners,id rather the vizsla anyday very versatile dogs mine work to gun and hawk,will go all day long ive fallen in love with the breed,cracking dogs....the weimeraners are a little harder and its a job to find a decent working strain but they are there more suited to big stuff like blood trailing deer etc they have stacks of guts!!!
Posted Image

Posted Image

#4 Borderer

Borderer

    Born Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Location:NW England

Posted 19 October 2006 - 10:17 pm

Cracking pics mate.... :clapper: the dog looks in good nick, a credit to you

#5 lampinglurcher

lampinglurcher

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • Location:Cornwall again

Posted 20 October 2006 - 02:52 pm

great pics mate :clapper: how do the two breeds compare in terms of style of hunting and working ability?

#6 guinness

guinness

    Rookie Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts

Posted 20 October 2006 - 04:13 pm

I had a wirehaired Viszla bitch and she was very easy to obedience train as she was so eager to please (not as easy to get working though)my friend has always had weimaraners both were for rough shooting. In a nutshell I'd say that the Viszla suited me better because they are quite a timid dog (with regards handling) and need a gentler approach just a sharp "hush" sound was enough to make her cower and she'd never been struck. Where as the weimars my mates always had suit him better because he's an impatient short tempered bully (and he'd admit to this) and they always seem to need a firmer hand.
Don't know if anyone else has found this I'd be interested to know.
You'll find quite a bit on the Viszlas on $%^&*&^%$£$%^&*( as they're a popular hawking dog. Personally I love em.

#7 lampinglurcher

lampinglurcher

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • Location:Cornwall again

Posted 21 October 2006 - 05:34 pm

I had a wirehaired Viszla bitch and she was very easy to obedience train as she was so eager to please (not as easy to get working though)my friend has always had weimaraners both were for rough shooting. In a nutshell I'd say that the Viszla suited me better because they are quite a timid dog (with regards handling) and need a gentler approach just a sharp "hush" sound was enough to make her cower and she'd never been struck. Where as the weimars my mates always had suit him better because he's an impatient short tempered bully (and he'd admit to this) and they always seem to need a firmer hand.
Don't know if anyone else has found this I'd be interested to know.
You'll find quite a bit on the Viszlas on $%^&*&^%$£$%^&*( as they're a popular hawking dog. Personally I love em.



thanks for the great replies guys :clapper: - keep 'em coming! -guiness, how does your vizsla work and what do you mean it was hard to get it working?
purely as a side note, how hard is it to find working vizsla breeders?

#8 guinness

guinness

    Rookie Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts

Posted 21 October 2006 - 08:06 pm

thanks for the great replies guys :clapper: - keep 'em coming! -guiness, how does your vizsla work and what do you mean it was hard to get it working?
purely as a side note, how hard is it to find working vizsla breeders?
[/quote]

I don't have mine anymore I had to pass her on(to a working home) due to the usual boring domestic type stuff. Still enough of that.
She was great with the obedience but was almost scared of game . This eventually became a good thing as she'd never even think of chasing so getting her to drop was always easy. She eventually cottoned on but my difficulty was that I couldn't get access to tame birds to teach her to point and other than my mates weimaraner couldn't work her with a dog that was already working. If i could have had either or both she'd have come on a lot quicker. With regards how she worked she was quite a close working dog so was always nicely in range( nevr more than 50 yards or so. I used to get a bit frustrated how she'd never go into any cover but I suppose if you want the dog to work in cover you'd get a springer. Either way what she did she did well and often very well. She went onto work with a falconer and I believe settled down nicely.

#9 lampinglurcher

lampinglurcher

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • Location:Cornwall again

Posted 22 October 2006 - 01:32 pm

[quote name='guinness' date='Oct 21 2006, 09:06 PM' post='137639']
thanks for the great replies guys :clapper: - keep 'em coming! -guiness, how does your vizsla work and what do you mean it was hard to get it working?
purely as a side note, how hard is it to find working vizsla breeders?
[/quote]

I don't have mine anymore I had to pass her on(to a working home) due to the usual boring domestic type stuff. Still enough of that.
She was great with the obedience but was almost scared of game . This eventually became a good thing as she'd never even think of chasing so getting her to drop was always easy. She eventually cottoned on but my difficulty was that I couldn't get access to tame birds to teach her to point and other than my mates weimaraner couldn't work her with a dog that was already working. If i could have had either or both she'd have come on a lot quicker. With regards how she worked she was quite a close working dog so was always nicely in range( nevr more than 50 yards or so. I used to get a bit frustrated how she'd never go into any cover but I suppose if you want the dog to work in cover you'd get a springer. Either way what she did she did well and often very well. She went onto work with a falconer and I believe settled down nicely.
[/quote]

did she go into cover at all? sorry for all the questions, just interested!

Edited by lampinglurcher, 22 October 2006 - 01:33 pm.


#10 nelson

nelson

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts
  • Location:that'd be telling

Posted 24 October 2006 - 07:04 pm

:clapper: There is no getting away from it they are beautiful looking dogs,nice pictures matey

#11 lampinglurcher

lampinglurcher

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • Location:Cornwall again

Posted 25 October 2006 - 08:22 am

http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... There is no getting away from it they are beautiful looking dogs,nice pictures matey


cant argue with it mate - they are stunning - a good bird puller in more ways than one!!!! :11:
apologies for the shitty pun, i couldnt help myself :11: :D

#12 jessdale

jessdale

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,004 posts
  • Location:there

Posted 26 October 2006 - 01:23 pm

When i attended alot of hpr field trials in the early nineties i used to speak to nigel cox,who at that time,was THE man with field trial vizsla`s.He was then the only person to have "made up" a homebred vizla to FTCH.He said they were a lot softer in temperament than a gsp,a good bolloking would set them back a week,but with gentle handling they were superb.I think his kennel name was "vollata" but i will stand being corrected on that.There was a saying amongst the main field trial people at that time that went something like "i wouldn`t give ten bob for every weimar in the country".I only saw two weimars in field trials over 4 seasons,both novice trials,and the dogs were more interested in fighting than in working.

#13 lampinglurcher

lampinglurcher

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • Location:Cornwall again

Posted 26 October 2006 - 04:09 pm

When i attended alot of hpr field trials in the early nineties i used to speak to nigel cox,who at that time,was THE man with field trial vizsla`s.He was then the only person to have "made up" a homebred vizla to FTCH.He said they were a lot softer in temperament than a gsp,a good bolloking would set them back a week,but with gentle handling they were superb.I think his kennel name was "vollata" but i will stand being corrected on that.There was a saying amongst the main field trial people at that time that went something like "i wouldn`t give ten bob for every weimar in the country".I only saw two weimars in field trials over 4 seasons,both novice trials,and the dogs were more interested in fighting than in working.



i have seen how soft they are, a while ago, last season i think it was i saw a bloke picking up with one, at one point a shot bird landed about 20 feet away from him, his vizsla made to get it and all he did was hiss and, his dog sat back down. so do you guys rate them? how do they compare to other retrievers in working standard? will they work cover to get a shot bird? will they constantly be waiting for your signal, or do they work more by their own accord? as i said, i really dont know much on this breed, any info at all would be helpfull!

#14 Garypco

Garypco

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,266 posts
  • Location:west wales

Posted 27 October 2006 - 12:18 am

[quote name='lampinglurcher' post='137191' date='Oct 20 2006, 03:52 PM']
great pics mate :clapper: how do the two breeds compare in terms of style of hunting and working ability?
[/quote]
both very similar in working style tho the vizsla has a bit more drive,when scent is poor,on the other hand the weimeraners are more suited to bigger game like foxes deer and pigs not that ive used them for big game personally!!!

id rate the vizsla over the weimeraner for temperament working ability and drive,if i had to choose the vizsla would win hands down every time!!!
Posted Image

Posted Image


[quote name='lampinglurcher' date='Oct 22 2006, 02:32 PM' post='137798']
[quote name='guinness' date='Oct 21 2006, 09:06 PM' post='137639']
thanks for the great replies guys :clapper: - keep 'em coming! -guiness, how does your vizsla work and what do you mean it was hard to get it working?
purely as a side note, how hard is it to find working vizsla breeders?
[/quote]

I don't have mine anymore I had to pass her on(to a working home) due to the usual boring domestic type stuff. Still enough of that.
She was great with the obedience but was almost scared of game . This eventually became a good thing as she'd never even think of chasing so getting her to drop was always easy. She eventually cottoned on but my difficulty was that I couldn't get access to tame birds to teach her to point and other than my mates weimaraner couldn't work her with a dog that was already working. If i could have had either or both she'd have come on a lot quicker. With regards how she worked she was quite a close working dog so was always nicely in range( nevr more than 50 yards or so. I used to get a bit frustrated how she'd never go into any cover but I suppose if you want the dog to work in cover you'd get a springer. Either way what she did she did well and often very well. She went onto work with a falconer and I believe settled down nicely.
[/quote]

did she go into cover at all? sorry for all the questions, just interested!
[/quote]
i have no problems getting mine into cover,theyle work more than adequately,they dont push as hard as a springer but they dont need to they work a very diferent style,as for being scared of game, i dont suffer that problem,she wont tangle live crows but shes a relentless hunter and never gives an inch,shel catch birds and rabbits if given the chance.lets just say i leave my springer home in favour of the vizsla when ever im hawking,that must say something in itself!!! :)

#15 lampinglurcher

lampinglurcher

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • Location:Cornwall again

Posted 29 October 2006 - 12:04 pm

its great to see people working them, especially in all the disciplines they were created to work. great looking dog mate - is that the one that has just had pups? if so, how long will it be before she can get back into shape and work?


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users