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is pasta any good for dogs


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#31 stabba

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:19 pm

The best and only diet a dog needs are red meat.. white meat.. vegatble (found within a whole carcass) bone and fresh drinking water........ a dog or wild animal doesnt need pasta in its diet at all... dogs derive energy from animal fat ... fact. ... atb stabba
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#32 Catcher 1

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:40 pm

The best and only diet a dog needs are red meat.. white meat.. vegatble (found within a whole carcass) bone and fresh drinking water........ a dog or wild animal doesnt need pasta in its diet at all... dogs derive energy from animal fat ... fact. ... atb stabba



Why cant people read the thread.Dog are not wild animal.(well not mine) Next time you see your vet ask the best diet for a pup :wallbash:

#33 stabba

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:49 pm

Yeah... how many vets are going to say BARF... not many ill bet mate.... Dogs are carnivores pure and simple... Not italian scrotes with a penchant for spaghetti... pasta may do good things for a dog.. but it aint a natural form of food for them.. atb stabba
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#34 Catcher 1

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:56 pm

Yeah... how many vets are going to say BARF... not many ill bet mate.... Dogs are carnivores pure and simple... Not italian scrotes with a penchant for spaghetti... pasta may do good things for a dog.. but it aint a natural form of food for them.. atb stabba



Not saying just feed it pasta but up to a year old it should be part of a dogs staple diet

#35 stabba

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:57 pm


Yeah... how many vets are going to say BARF... not many ill bet mate.... Dogs are carnivores pure and simple... Not italian scrotes with a penchant for spaghetti... pasta may do good things for a dog.. but it aint a natural form of food for them.. atb stabba



Not saying just feed it pasta but up to a year old it should be part of a dogs staple diet

Why?

#36 Catcher 1

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 12:01 am



Yeah... how many vets are going to say BARF... not many ill bet mate.... Dogs are carnivores pure and simple... Not italian scrotes with a penchant for spaghetti... pasta may do good things for a dog.. but it aint a natural form of food for them.. atb stabba



Not saying just feed it pasta but up to a year old it should be part of a dogs staple diet

Why?



Why are for real did you read the thread or just come on looking for a barney?

#37 stabba

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 12:12 am




Yeah... how many vets are going to say BARF... not many ill bet mate.... Dogs are carnivores pure and simple... Not italian scrotes with a penchant for spaghetti... pasta may do good things for a dog.. but it aint a natural form of food for them.. atb stabba



Not saying just feed it pasta but up to a year old it should be part of a dogs staple diet

Why?



Why are for real did you read the thread or just come on looking for a barney?



#38 stabba

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 12:15 am




Yeah... how many vets are going to say BARF... not many ill bet mate.... Dogs are carnivores pure and simple... Not italian scrotes with a penchant for spaghetti... pasta may do good things for a dog.. but it aint a natural form of food for them.. atb stabba



Not saying just feed it pasta but up to a year old it should be part of a dogs staple diet

Why?



Why are for real did you read the thread or just come on looking for a barney?

Not lookin for a barney at all mate.. just a difference of opinion.... why does a pup up to 12 month need pasta in its diet?? and do you stop feeding pasta after the age of 12 month.atb stabba

#39 Guest_chook_*

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 01:43 am

Although this is for sled dogs, which probably does more running that any lurcher would do,
it shows that more fat is needed, so depending on how much work is done, it should be adjusted accordingley,
they also give there dogs around 10,000 calories per day.

http://www.webheads..../info/info1.htm

A canine athlete does not digest and use food in the same way as humans. The high carbohydrate diet that helps a human runner perform at his or her peak will not have the same effect on a sled dog. Studies by veterinarians and dog food manufacturers have found that a high carbohydrate diet actually lowers canine performance.

Fats and protein are the most important sources of energy for a sled dog. The ratio of fat and protein varies depending on the distance to be run and the time spent running, however, certain minimum requirements have been determined. A typical diet consists of 32% protein, 15% carbohydrates and 53% fat.



#40 sandymere

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:19 am

From a topic back along, see carbohydrate part two or carbohydrate in the working dogs diet.


"Canine athletes depend on fats as their main fuel source when resting or at gentle exercise, 60% of energy supplied by fats at 40% of effort, however glucose converted from glycogen is needed especially during high intensity exercise such as sprinting. As exercise intensity increases the amount of glucose used increases whereas fat use remains relatively stable. So 80% of energy is supplied by glucose at 85% of effort."

#41 skellyb

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 11:29 am

Fat and protein can also be stored as glycogen, which makes carbohydrates unnecessary

#42 sandymere

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 03:11 pm

Fat and protein can also be stored as glycogen, which makes carbohydrates unnecessary


Lordy! Copy of a post on this from back along.

Carbohydrate part II.
The cereal debate.

Over the last 20'000 or so years, in all probability, man would have unknowingly bred dogs that do well on a relatively high carbohydrate diet. This idea is based on the premise that carbohydrates being the lowest value food in most societies are the most likely of all to be spared for feeding dogs. Therefore dogs that prospered on a high carb diet would have had better survival and so breeding potential. This was not a matter of evolving new abilities but rather the utilization of one already in place. Wolves, the excepted ancestor of modern dogs, have the ability to digest and utilize carbs and it’s this ability that that has been passed on to our pet dogs. Recently there has been an upsurge in new fashionable diets that seem to discount this useful ability and decry the use of any form of cereal. A dogs ability to convert fats etc into glucose (Gluconeogenesis formation of glucose from fats or proteins) is oft quoted as proof that dogs don’t need to eat carbs, using the theory that what the don’t need they shouldn’t have. If we were to look at the processes of Gluconeogenesis etc we will find that we can interchange the science between dogs and humans and so by this thinking say humans likewise don’t need carbohydrates in their diet. Personally I feel we are better to look beyond what we can be do without and rather we should see what benefits are gained from what we can do with.

The biological systems of digestion and energy production are older than either species and allowed man and his familiar, the dog, to dominate the earth. The ability to utilize a great variety of lifestyles and feeding opportunities allowed these two species to prosper in a great variety of habitats from tundra to desert. The remnants of their ‘wild’ ancestors still exist though only in the harshest areas, such as the Bushmen or San in the Kalahari, a few Inuit in the artic or wolves clinging to existence in the few pockets of remaining wilderness, all places that modern man and dogs didn’t really want. In my opinion just as we shouldn’t expect modern man to follow an Inuit diet because it is 'natural' neither should we limit our dogs to a diet based on, an interpretation of, what an isolated population of wolves eats today. Wolves, as with humans, had populations spread over a large part of the earth covering a great variety of habits. To base our diets on a few examples of wild groups would exclude the great variety of food sources and diets that were available to the great majority of ours and their ancestors living across the rest of the world.

Balance in dietary terms is not about exclusion but rather inclusion. To this must be added the lifestyle changes from those of their early ancestors as explored in Carbohydrate in the Working Canine diet. In exertional terms our working dogs are often expected to recover far quicker than nature intended. On a low carb diet Gluconeogenesis is he only way glucose for immediate use and for replenishment of stores can be produced. Gluconeogenesis needs a double process, lipid/protein digestion and then conversion, before the energy is near readiness for utilization and this can result in depleted stores unless there is an extended recovery period. The brain, eyes, red blood cells and to a large extent the heart use glucose and the muscles begin/increase glucose usage when contracting at speed i.e. sprinting, though arguably lactate will be used in some circumstances. If the stores are depleted then these areas are likely to be compromised which for a working dog may well reduce performance and increase strain on the body. Bearing this in mind to restrict a working/racing dog to a very low carbohydrate diet, i.e. exclusion of any cereals just a few raw vegetables, seems to hold little merit though it is one often advocated.

In conclusion science if often used to validate an individuals point of view but it needs to be born in mind that even if the science is correct if out of context it doesn’t prove anything. The example of Gluconeogenesis being used to prove dogs and so by the same theory humans, shouldn’t have, rather than can live without, eating carbs or another I read recently, carrots are high in sugar, are examples of misinformation. It’s not that they are wrong but incorrectly used that can lead to science misleading rather than helping us. I’m sure that these examples were not meant to mislead rather that those quoting them misunderstood the information themselves. So next time someone starts spouting science, especially me, remember any information scientific or otherwise is only as good as the way it is used.

Good Hunting sandymere.

Please see origanel discussion on this post for more indepth stuff.

#43 Ashab1

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 03:42 pm

if you feed your dog pasta it will end up with diabetes and rotten teeth same as what happens to people who eat to much pasta. At the worst feed it a cheap dry food but stick with meats and fats ox hearts, pigs liver, beef dripping, fish, eggs all cheap mixed with a decent qaulity mixer

#44 spep21

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 04:21 pm

I give mine dry food and carcusses and they've never refused to go out cos they're knackered.
If you watch a dog eat a carcus it will eat the vital organs and the fat inside the skin lining before it starts on the meat.
Must be something in that itself. Personally I would keep the pasta to a minimum if at all.

#45 Ashab1

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 04:43 pm

My dogs fit as a butchers dog lol




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