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skinning cradle/rack


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#1 Hoolit

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 09:51 pm

Hi all has anyone got any plans/sizes they could share for making a deer skining cradle for Roe.
Thanks in advance.

#2 flytie

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 09:43 am

I only know of the commercial ones, sold by Bushwear et al. So the question has to be can you make one as cheaply as you can buy one? To comply with Food Hygeine Legislation it would have to be stainless steel.

I have never used a cradle for either roe, fallow or the one munty I have skinned. I use a hoist and a gambrel.

To make a "food safe" preperation table i have had a piece of stailess steel made to fit on top of my chest freezer in the garage. Not perfect but better than nothing.

atb, ft

#3 ratattack

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 07:17 pm

No need for a cradle for skinning any uk deer, they can all be done easily and cleaner hanging up! :thumbs:

#4 nogger

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 07:10 pm

Ihave to agree with everyone , hanging is so much better , and all the craches iv used never seam to be the right hight !

#5 the wise man

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 11:24 pm

Balls. If you are skining 10 -12 red deer stags and hinds a day the cradle/rack is a good tool so think ? about it :bye: i say no more :doh:

#6 leegreen

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 11:34 pm

Is every one talking about a stainless coat hanger ting? if so you need some thing like that for sure or something to the effect.

reason for edit, speeling mistark.

Edited by leegreen, 20 February 2010 - 11:35 pm.


#7 nogger

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 11:29 am

Done all the sizes apart from cwd , but have to say i have a winch and a loading shovel so easy too hang them up !
but even so deer at roe size shudnt be a problem for a fitish stalker to hang up on his-her own and thats where
this all started !

#8 ratattack

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 11:46 am

Balls. If you are skining 10 -12 red deer stags and hinds a day the cradle/rack is a good tool so think ? about it http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub... i say no more http://www.thehuntinglife.com/forums/pub...



How many gamedealers use em???? None that i've known or worked in and they do hundreds in a day at times. Plus it takes two to skin properly on a cradle whereas 1 guy with a winch can do a hanging beast alone :thumbs: My ex headkeeper reckoned the cradle was the fastest way to skin a red so he challenged me to a race, me with 1 hanging and 2 of them on a cradle skinning. Needless to say i beat them and it was just as clean a carcase :toast:

Think i'll stick to skinning them hanging ta 8)

#9 HUnter_zero

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 01:33 pm

Hi all has anyone got any plans/sizes they could share for making a deer skining cradle for Roe.
Thanks in advance.



Much as everyone has a;ready said, unless you are processing a few deer a week a gambrel / hoist is the way to go. I used an old fire hose pulley for my hoist and before that I bolted four washing line pulleys together to make it easier to lift the carcass. Roe are easy to hoist, fallow easy, reds are a bit of a problem.
As for stainless etc. unless your going to sell the meat (which would be illegal unless you have a game-dealers licence) why worry. Most recreational stalkers either sell the carcass to a dealer or process the meat for their own consumption. I'm going to be making a butchers block this year (4'x3') and I'll use 6"x6" fence posts, glued and then bolted to make the whole thing. I could go to the expense of covering the work top but to my mind, as long as I know the meat is safe, that's all that matters.

John

#10 flytie

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 05:48 pm


Hi all has anyone got any plans/sizes they could share for making a deer skining cradle for Roe.
Thanks in advance.



As for stainless etc. unless your going to sell the meat (which would be illegal unless you have a game-dealers licence) why worry.

John


I do not think this is true, I quote from the "Food and Hygiene Legislation";

September draft
10
6. HUNTERS AND THE HUNTER EXEMPTION
For the purposes of this food hygiene legislation, hunters are people who shoot alone or are active
members of a hunting party (which would include non-shooting gamekeepers, ghillies, beaters and
pickers-up, but not mere spectators).
THE HUNTER EXEMPTION
This exemption recognises the close relationship between the producer and the consumer. It goes
beyond the primary producer exemption and allows you to supply wild game meat. You can
benefit from the hunter exemption if you shoot alone or if you take an active part in a hunting party.
Members of hunting parties and individual hunters are exempt from:
• having to develop their premises into an approved game handling establishment (AGHE).
All game must have been shot by hunting party members (it cannot be sourced from others)
and can be prepared into meat by any one (or more) of the party. The restrictions on small
quantities being supplied either direct to the final consumer or to local retailers are as for the
primary producer exemption (with ‘small quantities’ being under review).
It is the premises where you prepare meat that have to be local to the retailers you plan to supply
and not the place(s) where you shoot. So you can shoot on other people’s estates and then bring
the game back to your own premises.

Unquote.

I do believe that legally you should have the "Large Game Meat Hygiene" certificate (which is part of the new/ish DSC1 qualification, and previous DSC1 passers should have read themselves in to this requirement)before passing meat into the food chain. But this is not enforced. I do not think there has been a test case yet, and long may it be so.

ft


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