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Boars in Oz


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#61 spiderpig

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 02:13 am

are you kidding about them catching the wild bulls????? sounds bloody mental

#62 Ned Makim

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 02:59 am

No. Not kidding. I have video but I can't seem to get it onto youtube or whatever. Might be too big?? Any help I could get would be appreciated and then you'll see it for yourself.
Cheers.
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#63 Ned Makim

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 04:12 am

Trying to upload on here. Got some bull tying on you tube and now I can't embed it. I'll keep trying...

OK. I try to use the embed code on youtube and it just puts the code on here rather than the little TV screen thngo, what do I do?

Edited by Ned Makim, 02 February 2010 - 04:20 am.


#64 Ned Makim

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 04:22 am



This is the vid of tying up one of the scrub bulls. The bull has been chased by the bull catcher, the 4wd you can hear ticking over and see parked where it hit the bull. The bloke tying the back legs and doing the talking is Jason, an Aboriginal man who in this vid is catching for the money but also training some young blokes to keep them off the grog and the hooter (dope). The bigger bloke is Brett a mate of ours who wanted to have a go.

The bull is knocked over. In this case one Aboriginal boy has the tail but he is pretty casual about it because Brett is pulling the back legs back far enough to keep the bull off balance. Jason ties the back legs and then moves to the head, jams his foot on the bottom horn to limit head movement and then tells another yopung bloke where to stand and how to tie etc. Some of what Jason is saying is in the local Aboriginal language and some is in English. See if you can guess the English words...
Once the legs are strapped, that's it.

Some of the noise at the beginning is the chopper moving off to get more bulls and you can see the straps hanging off the roll bar of the bull catcher...

All this stuff I'm telling you blokes is real. It's no bloody joke putting your hands on a live scrub bull.
Cheers.

Edited by Ned Makim, 06 February 2010 - 06:13 am.


#65 Ned Makim

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 04:36 am

And I know the vid is crap quality. It was shot on my little dig still camera into the sun. But I guess you get the idea.
Cheers.

Note too that it is not the bull catcher holding the bull down. They just bumop them off their feet. It is the men stopping the bull getting up and killing us all. Hence the urgency of some of Jason's instructions...

Edited by Ned Makim, 02 February 2010 - 04:47 am.


#66 hollands hope

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 05:24 am

Massive beasts them scrub bulls by the looks of it ,impressive good read ,thanks for sharing :thumbs:

#67 Ned Makim

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 05:52 am

They can be smaller than, say, a brahman stud bull, but it's the hate in them that makes them dangerous. In the bush they are a chance to just go you on sight. I am very respectful of a scrub bull. They come from English shorthorn stock originally that was taken into the north when white people moved into that part of Oz. Now there is some brahman blood in them but heaps look like crazy versions of shorthorn stud stock.

Have a look at the look on the bulls face at the start of the video when he is looking at me. That's why I went around the back of the vehicle...

Cheers.

#68 waidmann

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 08:46 am

the video is not that bad mate. but christ almighty that must have taken some working out :thumbs:
24 in one day must be hard work too, they nust get some cash for them to warrant a heli? or is the land damage a factor too?

very different hunting to that which i have done,looks like good fun though( alot of things which can gore,disembowel,maim and kill are though aren't they :blink: )

keep it up ned,interesting stuff you get up to bud.
michael

#69 Ned Makim

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 02:05 am

Not that much money in it. From say $500 to $800 a bull live. The chopper costs about $300 an hour plus fuel so they make the pilot put down while a few bulls are collected. It's done for the money and to reduce the degradation of good cattle herds byt dodgy bulls and to save stud bulls from being bashed to death by these things.
Australians (in the bush anyway) don't necessarily do things because of money. There is a guts element that the blokes like to test. We think differently to other people...
Cheers.

Edited by Ned Makim, 03 February 2010 - 02:06 am.


#70 waidmann

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 08:24 am

sounds like good reasoning to me bud :thumbs:

#71 mikeyboy

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 08:42 am

you have some amazing sport mate. its a lot different to the things we hunt over hear with dogs. i wouldlove to come over and do a bit some time. i have a uncle that lives in brisbane so maybe one day. keepposting really goo.

atb mike

Edited by mikeyboy, 03 February 2010 - 08:49 am.


#72 Ned Makim

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 11:31 am

No worries Mike. Get out here and have a go but be preared for a long drive from Brisbane to bull land. I'm only five hours from Brisbane so you get down for a weekend run but the bulls might be two or three days travelling to get to them.
Cheers.

#73 bagzi

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 01:30 pm

Hello! Ned Just sat down with a coffee and had a look through all of your posts' now that look's like a Buzz. Were getting some Wild Boar over here now but I don't think they'll ever let us Hunt them with Dogs. theres still a few places in Europe where you can. I had these to Bitchs that were hunting Boar in sicily before they came to UK.Over here they had a few Fox's before the Ban.

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#74 ratkilla

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 02:50 pm

f*****g mental!! thats somthing live catching um. whilst out pig hunt do the dogs ever stray off on to the bulls ? Also do you ever hunt the dingos are they a big pest/predator to the livestock farmers?

#75 Ned Makim

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 05:48 pm

f*****g mental!! thats somthing live catching um. whilst out pig hunt do the dogs ever stray off on to the bulls ? Also do you ever hunt the dingos are they a big pest/predator to the livestock farmers?


Thanks for the responses fellas. Re chasing the bulls with dogs. In Oz the vast majority of pig dogs are single species hunters. They get shot if the catch livestock either by the landholder or by their owners. It's a big sin here if a pig dog grabs a sheep or a cow or anything other than a pig. Mostly you are hunting through proper domestic stock so the dogs just have to ignore them. Good dogs will run into a mob of , say, black Angus calves and ignore them to grab the boar hiding in the middle of them.
There are blokes who catch scrub bulls with dogs but those dogs can't be used around domestic cattle in the main.
We don't hunt wild dogs because there aren't many around here. Thje dingo fence keeps most out of NSW and half of Queensland . If you lose a pig dog in dingo country, especially in the hills, the dingoes tend to mob up on the dog and kill it. But I know one pro dog trapper (Measles, so called because he has freckles...) who had a rough dog that loved catching wild dogs and killing them. We called him a stag type, ie a hairy running dog.
Cheers.

Edited by Ned Makim, 04 February 2010 - 05:49 pm.





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