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First Shotgun Advice


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#1 rtrotter

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 06:55 pm

Evening all.
I'm a complete novice hoping for some practical advice regarding a good choice of 12 gauge shotgun, to be used for clays and hopefully game next season. With a limited budget, upto about 700 quid. I've seen a new Webley and Scott 912 that appears to be of reasonable quality and looks nice but i've had conflicting opinions about it. Does anyone here own one or ever used one? I've been advised that a Lanber would be a good alternative. What other makes/ models should i consider? What about second hand guns in the same price range? Any advice/ comments will be appreciated.
Thankyou in advance.

Edited by rtrotter, 22 November 2009 - 07:42 pm.


#2 Geoff.C

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 08:17 pm

I can't recall much on here about Webleys. There must be some who use them? At the clay club I go to, no one has one as far as I know. When the "new" Webley range first came out, there were some quality problems, but I believe there has been a shake up or manufacturer change, so are improved now. I think they are still made in Turkey though. This is only what I have read in magazines. There was a lifetime warranty with them,may still be? Don't rush into buying any shotgun anyway. You should try as many as you can, to see what you are most comfy with. Although most are built to suit "Mr Average", they do vary in the way they feel in your hands and how they swing. Muzzle heavy or not etc. Most of the big clay grounds will have a selection, mostly over/under and semi auto. Lanber is a good starter or budget gun, they are well made and look good. The selector/safety catch gives trouble occasionally. If I were to be looking to spend 700 quid, I would probably go for a 2nd hand Beretta 686, bomb proof and plenty about. Also good, are Browning and Miroku. Find a clay ground near you, go and have a lesson or two, try all the guns you can.
Tip--- When you buy your gun cabinet, get one to fit at least 4 guns. Whatever you buy initially, you will decide you want another, maybe a side by side for a change on game days. Then something else will take your fancy!!
Welcome to the world of shotguns, have fun.

#3 rtrotter

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 10:13 pm

Thanks very much Geoff, that's given me a shove in the right direction. Will have a browse on ukgunroom, quite like the idea of a second hand beretta. I'm planning on having some lessons in the near future, being quite expensive I want to know I'm getting something out of them. What would the structure of a good first lesson be so I know whether to bother going back or not? I live in Kent, I've heard West kent offers a good service. Anyone been there/ had lessons with them? Thanks again for your time Geoff, not sure if these forums get fed up with newbies like me asking naive questions about 'my first shotgun', so I appreciate your comprehensive reply, cheers mate.

#4 Geoff.C

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 06:59 pm

No problem, glad to help out. West Kent advertise in the CPSA "Pull" magazine, I have no personal experience there but they look to have a nice place, and do lessons for novices. In case you need it, their phone number is 01892 834306. As a novice, I would expect you will get a talk on safe handling of shotguns to start with.Next, establish if you have a master eye problem or not. Then talk about shooting safely, so as not to endanger others etc. They will find a gun to suit you,fit you up with ear plugs, then perhaps have a bash at a single incomer. It helps your confidence if you can dust about half of the first ten clays. You will then probably go on a skeet range, this will help you start to understand the mysteries of lead, in that although some types of clay can be shot "at", mostly you have to shoot in front to break it.

#5 terrierist

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 09:51 am

I dont think anyone can say more than Geoff.c!! Perfect advice!!




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